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CNN
Jun 28, 2013 1:00am PDT
words in. turning it into trayvon martin was profiled. we turn to the latest on that and the other key developments. this captivating testimony, what stood out to you? >> there were a number of thi s things. this is a young lady going up against don west. they were going toe-to-toe. west was able to question the credibility of some of the statements she made implying she said certain things in testimony. she was saying something different when she got on the witness stand. sometimes it was the words she attributed to george zimmerman. sometimes she left out the racial remarks. it went back and forth like that. other times, it was less about the testimony and more about a test of wills. take a listen. >> so the last thing you heard was some kind of noise like something hitting somebody? >> trayvon got hit -- >> you don't know that, do you? >> no, sir. >> you don't know that trayvon got hit. you don't know that trayvon didn't, at that moment, take his fist and drive it into george zimmerman's face, do you? >> no, sir. >> the no, sir could be interpreted as she didn't know that, but denyi
CNN
Jul 2, 2013 9:00am PDT
about him first noticing who later became known to all of us as trayvon martin. >> he observed trayvon walking between two sets of town homes and looking into, i believe there was a window to one where the light was on and you could see someone was looking into the window of a town home. it was about that time that trayvon and george made eye contact with each other. both aware of the other's presence. >> okay. in that initial contact did he seem to you as though he was angry or anything like that with who this person was? >> no, no. george said he wanted to make sure he just got with non-emergency dispatch and had them send a police officer. >> he told you he did that? >> immediately. >> you know from your conversation with george that entire conversation was recorded, correct? >> yes, i do. >> from your conversation with george about this night and other nights george zimmerman knows those phone calls are recorded? >> yes. >> tell me then again he's explaining to you that trayvon martin is walking up and near his vehicle at some point? >> correct. >> came walking from between
MSNBC
Jun 27, 2013 7:00am PDT
letter on march 19th, at no time did you mention that you heard trayvon martin say "a little, get off, get off"? >> yes, sir. >> is that correct did you say that? >> yes, sir. >> in the meeting that you had, the conversation that you had with miss fulton on march 19th, before you did the interview later, and in the written statement that you prepared for miss fulton, a personal statement, in neither of those instances did you say that you heard trayvon martin say as you said later," a little get off get off," correct? >> yes, sir. >> that's because you didn't think it was that important at that point? >> crump asked me about when the fight started in the grass, he didn't ask me about that. he asked me about that. >> so, when you decided what part of what you knew to tell miss fulton, you decided not to tell her that part? >> your honor, objection. >> i'm not sure that was her answer so you need to reask the question. i believe she said they never asked her that. >> all right. i'm asking about this witness's thinking. so when you decided what part of the information that you had ab
MSNBC
Jun 28, 2013 11:00am PDT
. >> and the male that was on the ground, did you later learn that person's name to be trayvon martin? >> that's correct. >> and did you go over to trayvon martin's location? >> i walked towards it, yes. >> and how was trayvon martin's body positioned when you arrived? >> face down, his hands were underneath the body. >> and to your knowledge, were you the first officer to approach trayvon martin? >> yes. >> all right. did you know whether or not he was dead or alive at that point? >> i did not. >> did you know what his involvement was at that point? >> i did not. >> did you give him any commands, trayvon martin? >> yes, i did. >> what commands did you give him? >> i asked to see his hands. >> and where were his hands when you asked to see them? >> underneath him. >> he was lying on his stomach? >> correct. >> did trayvon martin respond physically in any way to your commands? >> no, he did not. >> did trayvon martin respond verbally in any way to your commands? >> no, he did not. >> did you see any movement from trayvon martin's body? >> i did not. >> did you hear any sounds from trayvon martin'
CNN
Jun 27, 2013 6:00am PDT
flattering to trayvon martin. he used despairing language when she spoke of george zimmerman. i think when you take all the testimony into context, that just helps the prosecution because if this jury, carol, believes what she is saying. they will believe that george zimmerman was the initial aggressor. under the law, that means self-defense isn't really a available to him. i think that's why this witness is so very crucial to the prosecution. >> page, as a defense attorney, we've seen that rachel is bei combative. as a defense attorney, what special challenges does that present? >> it does present challenges. you don't want to beat up a witness who is essentially a 19-year-old girl. i expect the jury will come in there already bias towards trayvon. she's a friend towards vavon. what you do as a defense lawyer, don't keep her up there for another two or three hours. hit the key points and show that she's bias and show she has been consistent in her earlier testimony and evidence. >> there are inconsistencies in her story, though, paige. number one, she lied about her age to trayvon martin'
CNN
Jul 5, 2013 6:00am PDT
every one of them then told you that they agree with your opinion that it was trayvon martin's voice, correct? >> they didn't tell me anything. >> when you mentioned a moment ago that you didn't know what the tape was about, nobody spoke to you to tell you that you would soon be listening to screams from the event that led to your son's death? >> no. >> mayor triplett never said anything like that to you? >> no. >> nor any of your other family members? >> they didn't hear the tape at that time. >> the question is whether or not anyone told you to prepare yourself for the event of the trauma of having to listen to somebody scream moments before your son was shot. >> no. >> nobody mentioned that to you? >> no. >> tracy martin never told you about that? >> no. >> you just need to listen to it one time, correct? >> that's it. >> thank you, your honor. >> any redirect? >> you were asked about hope did you hope your son wouldn't be dead, trayvon martin. you were asked by defense counsel, were you hoping he was still alive? >> i was hoping he was still alive. >> did you enjoy listening to t
MSNBC
Jul 5, 2013 6:00am PDT
them then told you that they agreed with your opinion that it was trayvon martin's voice, correct? >> they didn't tell me anything. >> when you mentioned a moment ago that you didn't know what -- nobody spoke to you to tell you that you would soon be listening to screams from the event that led to your son's death? >> no. >> mayor triplet never said anything like that to you? >> no. >> nor did any of your other family members? >> they haddent heard the tape at that time. >> the question is whether or not anyone told you to prepare yourself for the event, for the trauma, of having to listen to somebody scream moments before your son was shot? >> no. >> nobody mentioned that to you? >> no. >> tracy martin never told you about that? >> no. >> and you just listened to it one time, correct? >> that's it. >> a moment your honor. >> thank you, your honor. obviously based upon [ inaudible ]. >> any redirect? >> yes, your honor. >> you were asked about hope. did you hope your son wouldn't be dead, trayvon martin? you were asked by the defense counsel about hope. you still hoping he would s
CNN
Jul 3, 2013 7:00pm PDT
prosecution calling what could be its next to last witness today. a dna expert and trayvon martin's mother expected to take the stand on friday before the prosecution rests. another big day in a trial that's had nothing but big days so far. martin savidge starts us off. >> reporter: though the symbol to many, the hooded sweatshirt trayvon martin wore the night he was killed is also a key piece of evidence. the state expert said he found no trace of george zimmerman's dna on that sweatshirt, not each on the sleeves or cuffs nearest to the fist the defendant says trayvon martin was hitting him with. and no zimmerman dna was found on martin's fingernails. what about martin's dna, was it found on the gun which by one zimmerman account, the teen actually reached for and touched. >> a swab or the dna that you developed from the pistol grip of the defendant's gun, it was positive for blood, correct? >> yes. >> and then there was a mixture, the major was matched to the defendant, george zimmerman? >> yes. >> and you were able to exclude trayvon martin as having dna on the pistol grip, is that corr
CNN
Jun 27, 2013 7:00pm PDT
attributed to george zimmerman. sometimes she left out the racial remarks that trayvon martin made of zimmerman. it went back and forth like that. and other times it seemed like it became less about the testimony and more about a test of wills. take a listen. >> so the last thing you heard was some kind of noise, like something hitting somebody? >> trayvon got hit. >> you don't know that, do you? >> no. >> you don't know that trayvon got hit. >> he -- >> you don't know that trayvon at that moment take his fist and drive it into george zimmerman's face, do you? >> no, sir. >> reporter: the no sir could be interpreted is that she's denying what don west is saying. it went back and forth. >> her testimony today, there were a lot of questions and clarifying about race. how did that play out? >> reporter: well, you know, race, of course, has been a key factor in this story ever since the beginning. in fact, many say that's what took it from a local tragedy and propelled it to a national debate. but today what don west was trying to say is look, it's been george zimmerman that's been por
CNN
Jul 5, 2013 9:00am PDT
emotional and brought us back to trayvon martin. instead they put on an expert. these experts always have issues because they want to testify as if they are lecturing. in this case they want to make their own rules and bring in their notes. the defense has an expert who has written the book on pathology. in comparison so what they are putting on last this is the way they want to leave the jury. it's almost incredible to me. i think he's doing a poor job and the fact the notes regardless there's anything in there damaging or not, the fact they had a break because of it makes the state look bad on their last witness. >> let me know your thoughts about this. you're a tough defender. would you not be a little delighted at this point to find some fresh new discovery that no one expected to come in. >> i'd be doing a dance of joy. i wonder if this is his first time at the rodeo. how could he not know as a medical examiner who has probably testified before that you cannot do this. these kind of notes are obviously discoverable particularly if you refer to them on the stand. this is just --
MSNBC
Jul 2, 2013 8:00am PDT
? >> no, sir. >> when -- the suggestion is why didn't trayvon martin have blood on his hands, does -- is blood susceptible to gravity as well? >> yes, sir, it is. >> p he gets smashed in the most and thrown on the ground, which way is the blood going? >> towards the ground. >> back down his throat. >> back down his loetd. >> only when he stands up is it going to stop coming out of his nostrils which is after he's no longer being mount bid trayvon martin? >> typically, yes, sir. >> break my nose, put me on the ground, my blood going back into my throat. >> theoretically, yes. >> would not be available to be on trayvon martin's hands at that point because there was no blood outside of the nose, correct? >> correct. >> i'm not going to approach you like he did. left -- if he's holding him down, could that be literally momentary she holding him down and mr. zimmerman is trying to get back up? >> yes, sir. >> could he attempt to suffocate momentary as well? >> yes, sir. >> could it be a sleeve or an arm or -- a palm or -- anything that could have given mr. zimmerman that impression? >> yes, s
CNN
Jun 27, 2013 11:00pm PDT
with authorities, that young lady was sitting in the home of trayvon martin's mother and seated next to her when she gave that first testimony was sabrina, trayvon martin's mother. so they are trying to imply that her testimony could have actually been encouraged or somehow interfered with just by having trayvon's mother right next to her. >> another witness called is jenna lower. she made one of the 911 calls. jurors heard her call, the yelling and the gunshots. what did she say that was so important? >> that's the thing, what she had to say really was not so important. she didn't bring such dynamic or anything new, but of course her call everybody knows. if she hadn't made the call at the seem she did, you never could have caught the gunshot and the screams that are at the center of such a huge debate in this case. it allowed for her call to be introduced, but she really didn't bring too much. >> thanks very much. we'll take a more look at rachel jeantel's demeanor and the attempt for the prosecution's star witness, let's remember that, she was the star witness. as you saw in
CNN
Jul 2, 2013 8:00am PDT
moment, your honor. and finally, you do not have the phone records in terms of trayvon martin or rachel jeantel, right, the lady that he was talking to, to determine whether it was actually based on when the defendant's phone finished or not? >> no, sir, i did not. >> in other words, you didn't have the defendant's phone records either, did you? >> no, sir. >> and i'm talking about the february 29th interview, i apologize. >> i was assuming that, yes. >> thank you, no further questions. >> thank you. we've been here almost two hours this morning on cross. now you're seeking to re-recross. i will give you five minutes. it's the state's witness and the state will have another five minutes on re-re-redirect. >> sorry, your honor, there's just a new areas he's gone into and i have to address them. >> well, you have five minutes for your re-recross. >> yes, your honor. as far as any blood on mr. zimmerman's hands, when he got to you he was already cleaned up by emts and he had washed himself at spd, correct? >> yes, sir. >> you wouldn't expect to find blood on his hands at that point, would
CNN
Jul 2, 2013 1:00pm PDT
murder charges for shooting 17-year-old trayvon martin, who was unarmed. but all along zimmerman has said the shooting was in self-defense. prosecutors are trying to show zimmerman not only profiled martin, but that he followed the teen and misled police about how the fight with martin went down. the state started out today fairly strong with key testimony from the lead investigator on the case but things fizzled fast when prosecutors called an unusual witness to the stand, george zimmerman's best friend. then came a crucial account of george zimmerman's injuries from the chief medical examiner. before we show you some of the highlights from today's testimony, let's bring in marcia clark, former lead prosecutor for the o.j. simpson murder trial and author of "killer ambition." she's joined by cnn legal correspondent jeanne cassaras. let's go over the law. it's no surprise that much of today's testimony resolved around the injuries that george zimmerman sustained that night. the medical examiner was asked to look at the photo evidence of zimmerman's injuries. let's play some of that f
MSNBC
Jun 27, 2013 3:00pm PDT
. tonight's lead, the grueling cross-examination of trayvon martin's friend. day 14 in george zimmerman's murder trial, the defense finally wrapped up its questioning of rachel jeantel, the 19-year-old who was on the phone with trayvon martin moments before he was killed. this cross-examination lasted five hours over two days. also today, testimony from the neighbor who made the 911 call, where loud screaming can be heard, and then a gunshot. jurors heard her account of that scream. and today another witness testified she saw george zimmerman on top of trayvon martin after the altercation. she is the third witness to say so. but for most of the day, rachel jeantel faced questions from the zimmerman defense team. and they tried to undermine her story. the defense repeatedly raised questions about her version of events, but she did not waiver from her testimony that trayvon martin did not confront george zimmerman. >> he said why are you following me for, didn't he? >> no, sir, not that kind of way, sir. >> it was just a question, hey, mister, why are you following me for? >> he
CNN
Jul 3, 2013 10:00pm PDT
trayvon martin wore the night he was killed is a key piece of evidence. the state expert said he found no trace of george zimmerman's dna on the sweatshirt. not even on the sleeves or cuffs, nearest to the fit fists that the defendant says martin was hitting him with and no dna under his fingernails and what about martin's dna? was it found on the gun which by one zimmerman account the teen actually reached for and touch. >> swab you developed from the pistol grip of the defendant's gun was positive for blood, correct? >> yes. >> there was a mixture. the major matched the defendant george zimmerman and you were able to exclude trayvon martin as having dna on the pistol grip, is that correct? >> yes, trayvon martin was excluded as being a possible contributor to the mixture on the grip. >> the hoodie was tested by a firearms expert said the hoodie was touching it. >> what did you find when you conducted the test with the sweatshirt. >> it was consistent with rez deuce and physical effect of a contact shot. >> again, evidence saying the end of the gun was against the material when it was fi
MSNBC
Jul 1, 2013 3:00pm PDT
second-degree murder trial, george zimmerman's account of shooting trayvon martin was played for the jury. prosecutors today questioned two investigators who interviewed mr. zimmerman in the hours and days following the shooting. and they played those interviews in court. the prosecution also played mr. zimmerman's walk-through of the crime scene the morning after the shooting, trying to highlight some apparent inconsistencies in his account. at one point today, jurors watched how police question mr. zimmerman about his version of events. >> i don't know how this is going to go at this point. what he was doing when he came to your car, he probably wouldn't be here right now. did that ever register to you at all. >> i guess that i answer to his family right now. >> yes, sir. >> why didn't it occur to you -- i mean, a lot of what we do in law enforcement is basically without talking and a lot of casual encounters, intentional encounters we call them. we might be trying to detect something. but did it ever oh can curr to you to actually ask this person what he was doing out there? >> no
MSNBC
Jul 5, 2013 10:00am PDT
. zimmerman has pled not guilty citing self-defense. a key witness, trayvon martin's mother, took the stand earlier today, along with trayvon's brother, and the county medical examiner. while it has been an emotional day in court, a series of procedural setbacks disrupted the testimony on several occasions as the court grappled with issues relating to its own evidence locker. for the latest, let's bring in msnbc's craig melvin who is live at the courthouse. craig, give us the sequence of important events today. >> reporter: chris, you just mentioned that evidence locker. that held up court for about half-an-hour. basically it appears as if whoever had the key to that evidence locker couldn't find it so we had to call a locksmith to get the evidence locker re-opened. sybrina fulton, of course, as you mentioned was the first witness called today. her testimony was interrupted because they needed to get some evidence out. the most important piece of testimony from fulton this morning was the fact that she says -- she testified that the screaming heard in the background of one of those 91
FOX News
Jul 2, 2013 12:00pm PDT
county. the medical examiner did not examine the body of trayvon martin, but instead is working off reports and has described zimmerman's injuries to his head as minor. now the defense attorney continues questioning. let's his listen. >> consistent with one but suggested by turning the head in different ways, it could be three. >> three or four? >> with no injury, yes. if the head did not contact, yes. >> how about below the laceration? did you notice that? >> the contusion. >> below. could that have been a separate injury? >> it's possible. >> well, if the head was hit so that just the crown hit the cement one time, let's say his head just snapped back and -- that could have caused one of the lacerations, correct? >> yes. so close to each other. that's the approximately that really kind of makes it possible. >> i appreciate that. so, if the head was tilted one way and then smacked back, so this was the crowning point, that would be one laceration. >> it's possible. >> then if the head was this way, another laceration injury. >> that's possible. >> if way was able to resist a toss,
CNN
Jul 5, 2013 10:00am PDT
trayvon martin. dr. shiping bao did not want his notes to be reviewed by don west. the doctor's testimony has been c contentious throughout cross-examination. let's listen. >> you know as a training experience that if clothing is wet it needs to be packaged in paper bags? >> yes. >> if plastic bags are used -- >> we would let them dry a little bit. >> did that happen in this case? >> again, i do not know. >> okay. the procedure would have been -- >> yes. >> to tdry the clothing and package it in paper. >> i cannot tell you anything. >> you do know from the photograph of the sweatshirt, the hooded sweatshirt it looked wet? >> yes. >> it would be inappropriate and a violation of protocol to take a wet sweatshirt and seal it in a plastic bag? >> there are no plastic bag other than plastic bag carry the body. >> in other words, you would never in your lab take a wet piece of clothing that's potentially evidence and seal it in a plastic bag? >> if anybody do that he'll be gone next day. he'll be fired. >> all right. that was testimony a little bit earlier. live pictures right now. we understan
CNN
Jul 3, 2013 1:00am PDT
threatening. the key reason zimmerman is given for shooting trayvon martin. >> how would you classify the injuries to the defendant's head? >> they were not life threatening. they were very insignificant. they did not require any sutures to be applied to mr. zimmerman. so i would refer to them insignificant injuries. >> reporter: on cross-examination, the defense attorney mark o'mara implied valerie rao owed her job to the special prosecutor in the zimmerman case. and then walked her back from some of her findings. >> it's your position that it's consistent that george zimmerman may have only received as little as three -- did you call -- what term did you -- smasher? >> sorry? >> slamming. three slammings into cement, correct? >> i didn't use the word slamming. >> i'm sorry, i thought that was your word. >> no, i got that from the re-enactment. >> what word would you use? >> impact. >> so it's your position there are at least three impacts between that head and cement? >> yes. concrete. >> reporter: earlier, zimmerman's best friend took the stand, it was mark osterman who first convinced
CNN
Jun 28, 2013 11:00am PDT
you later learn the person's name to be trayvon martin? >> that's correct. >> did you go over to trayvon martin's location? >> i walked toward, yes. >> and how was trayvon martin's body positioned when you arrived? >> facedown, his hands were underneath the body. >> and to your knowledge, were you the first officer to approach trayvon martin? >> yes. >> all right. did you know whether or not he was dead or alive at that point? >> i did not. >> did you know what his involvement was at that point? >> i did not. >> did you give him any commands, trayvon martin? >> yes, i did. >> what command did you give him? >> i asked to see his hands. >> where were his hands when you asked to see them? >> undermanaged in him. >> he -- underneath him. >> he was lying on his stomach? >> correct. >> dr. trayvon martin respond physically in any way to your commands? >> no, he did not. >> did trayvon martin respond verbally in any way to your commands? >> no, he did not. >> did you see any movement from trayvon martin's body? >> i did not. >> did you hear any sounds from trayvon martin's body? >> i di
CNN
Jul 4, 2013 8:00am PDT
tells about the night he shot and killed trayvon martin. >> reporter: the day started with a parade of witnesses from george zimmerman's past, from the professors who taught him about criminal justice -- >> you see george over here? >> how are you doing, george? >> reporter: to a represent from a virginia police department that rejected his application to be a police officer. >> mr. zimmerman had a problem with his credit? >> yes, sir. >> and that would be a reason why you wouldn't be accepted as a police officer? >> that's the reason why we did not consider him further based on that record, yes, sir. >> reporter: zimmerman's past could haunt him if jurors are swayed by the picture prosecutors are trying to paint, a wannabe cop who went too far, then less than forthcoming about how well he knew the law on national tv. >> prior to this night, this incident, had you even heard stand your ground? >> no, sir. >> you'd never heard about it before? >> no. >> reporter: captain alexis francisco carter told the court part of the course he taught covered self defense laws with a special focus on
FOX News
Jul 5, 2013 12:00pm PDT
. tensions rubbing high at the murder trial of george zimmerman. when trayvon martin's mother told the court it was her son screaming for help in a 9-1-1 call from the night of the shooting. watch our the mother sat stone-faced while prosecutes played the call. >> i i don't know what's going on. yelling help? >> yes. >> what is your -- >> is there a gunshot? >> yes. >> ma'am, that screaming or yelling, do you recognize that? >> yes. >> who do you recognize that do to be? >> trayvon benjamin martin. >> a dramatic moment. also telling the court she heard her son crying or yelling before, just feet away from her. the man who killed her 17-year-old son, but george zimmerman says he pulled the trigger in self-defense. that's why the screaming on the 9-1-1 call could be a crucial piece offed and could ultimately support or refute zimmerman's claim. the defense cross examined trayvon martin's mother but rap into a little trouble at the start. >> good morning, ma'am. >> good morning. >> firstly, truly apologize for your loss -- >> improper question. >> excuse me? >> you need to ask a quest
MSNBC
Jun 27, 2013 9:00am PDT
track of what we're doing here. so you were in the bathroom, and because of what trayvon martin was saying, you were paying more attention at this moment than you had been previously? >> yes, sir. >> and that you knew at this point that he had run and that he had lost the man. correct? >> yes, sir. >> and that his voice had changed. >> yes, sir. >> and you thought it was because he was tired from running. >> he sound tired, sir. >> and you don't know how far he may have run. >> no, sir. >> objection. >> overruled. that will be the last time for that question. >> you don't know how far he had run? >> no, sir. >> and you have this conversation with him for a couple of minutes, and then he says he sees the man again. >> yes, sir. >> and are you really paying attention now? >> i been paying attention, sir. >> i'm sorry? >> i been paying attention, sir. >> i was -- >> been paying attention, sir. >> so after you are talking to him on the phone, he seems out of breath for a couple of minutes. he says to you, he sees the man again and you pay particular attention now? >> i was been paying a
FOX News
Jul 2, 2013 8:00am PDT
shot trayvon martin. we'll bring you the dramatic new developments, get you caught up on that. growing questions as we learn that a ten-year-old girl whose family successfully fought to get her an adult lung transplant didn't have just one transplant last month but two. we'll tell you more about this story. and he's one of just five surviving quadruple amputees, veterans from the wars in afghanistan and iraq. the remarkable recovery of travis mills. a great story about determination. it's all "happening now." central casting we're not. the lead investigator, the bleed detective who really investigated the fatal shooting of trayvon martin back on the stand today, and his testimony has been one to watch. we are glad you are with us, everybody, i'm jenna lee. >> reporter: i'm rick folbaum in for jon scott. chris serino is answering questions. today's proceedings beginning with a key decision by the judge. jenna: very interesting the judge throwing out part of yesterday's cross-examination by the man on your screen there defense attorney mark o'mara who -- where detective serino s
CNN
Jul 2, 2013 6:00am PDT
interviewed without an attorney present. she said he didn't realize trayvon martin died from the shooting until she told him. she told defense attorneys zimmerman dropped his head to the table. >> any evidence he was angry with trayvon martin? >> no. >> that he had hatred for him? >> no. >> spite or ill will? >> no. >> that he had anything that would suggest to you some type of bad attitude towards trayvon martin? >> no. >> rather he seemed to be effected by the fact that he realized that trayvon martin had passed? >> he seemed affected by that. >> reporter: one day after the shooting, and george zimmerman returned to this neighborhood with lead investigator chris serino to do a video reenactment. serino later conducted a more aggressive interview, challenging zimmerman on some points. for instance, in the first statement zimmerman talked about trayvon martin jumping out of bushes to ambush him. in the reenactment, he didn't mention that, but in court, serino's final analysis -- >> did you notice anything to bring to the jury's attention today that caused you that concern? >> not
MSNBC
Jul 2, 2013 3:00pm PDT
. zimmerman allegedly received from trayvon martin that night were, quote, insignificant, a claim that could undermine his claim of self-defense. also today, the lead investigator testified mr. zimbabwe may have profiled trayvon martin the night he shot him, acting out of, quote, ill will and spite. and jurors heard a tv news interview george zimmerman gave nearly a year ago in which he said he had no regrets about his decisions the night of the shooting. a dramatic day in court, but perhaps the key testimony came from that medical examiner who did not perform the autopsy on trayvon martin, but who was asked to review the evidence by the state. she offered her expert opinion on mr. zimmerman's injuries. >> are any injuries in this photograph life-threatening? >> no. >> why not? >> he has no loss of consciousness whatsoever. he didn't have to go to the hospital. he went to a clinic. >> are any of those abrasions life-threatening? >> no. >> and how would you classify the abrasions depicted in state 73? >> very insignificant. if somebody's head is repeatedly slammed concrete with gre
FOX News
Jul 1, 2013 12:00pm PDT
killed trayvon martin. let's listen. >> i could get it -- only had a small portion of my head on the concrete so i tried to squirm off the concrete, and when i did that, somebody here opened the door and i said, help me, help me, and i said -- he said, i'll call 9-1-1. i said, no, help me. i need help. i don't know what they did, but that when my jacket -- i had my firearm on my right hip, and my jacket moved up and he saw -- i feel like he saw it, looked at it, he said, you're going to die, and he reached for me -- reached for what -- i saw his arm going down to my side, and i grabbed it and grabbed my firearm and i shot one time. >> you shot him -- what did he say? >> after i shot him he, like, sat up dna -- >> you're still. [inaudible] >> i shot him. and i didn't think i hit him. he got up and says, you got me. and you got it, you've got me, something like that. so he was just saying, i'm giving up. so i don't know if i pushed him off me, either way, i got on top of him, and pushed his arms apart. >> roll him over? >> i don't remember how i got on top of him. i'm sorry. i got on -
FOX News
Jun 27, 2013 6:00am PDT
when he saw trayvon martin walking through his gated community. >> there's a break-in in my neighborhood recently. >> can you describe the two males. >> two african-american males. >> white, black or hispanic? >> black. >> the prosecution saying seeing trayvon martin was the straw that broke the camel's back. heather: zimmerman is claiming self-defense. but if found guilty of second degree murder he faces a mandatory minimum of 25 years. and a $10,000 fine. we'll ask lis weihl and mark fuhrman which side appears to be scoring the most points with the jury so far. former south african president nelson mandela is on life support. he has spent weeks in the hospital. he has a lung infection. what is the latest on his condition? >> reporter: we are just outside the hospital where nelson mandela is being treated. the father of south africa. the first black president here literally fating for his life. we have confirmed according to one family member of the mandelas that he is on life support. we heard from a spokesman saying he's in very critical condition. so critical that the pr
CNN
Jul 5, 2013 8:00am PDT
you able based on the autopsy able to say exactly the position that trayvon martin was -- >> good morning. i'm ashley banfield live in sanford, florida. we are at the top of the hour. the prosecutor in the trayvon martin second-degree murder case is questioning the final witness. critical to get you up to speed on how the case is wrapping up today. first on the stand with powerful testimony, trayvon martin's mother. second on the stand, trayvon martin's brother. both of them testifying to who it was scream iing on the 911 cl the night trayvon died. both testifying that was trayvon martin. the brother having to admit i wasn't so certain when i was questioned earlier on oh in this case. back in with the medical examiner testifying as to the injury, bullet wound and contact made with the droopy sweatshirt so critical as to the position of trayvon's body during the fight. let's listen. >> i need to ek plain to the jury how i have an opinion. opinion is based on the fact and my lifetime learning experience. >> you are talk about other autopsies. >> yes. i believe trayvon martin was ali
CNN
Jun 26, 2013 10:00pm PDT
. >> reporter: rachel jeantel and trayvon martin were old friends, and contrary to reports, they were only friends. >> you weren't in any way his girlfriend? >> no. >> reporter: the two reconnected just weeks before trayvon martin's death. on the night he died from the other end of the phone line, she was, in a sense, within earshot of the tragedy as it unfolded. that's why she's the state's star witness, the only one they think who can tell trayvon's side of the story. >> what was he complaining about? >> that a man kept watching him. >> reporter: it was clear from the start she does not relish her new found fame, mumbling her answers. the court reporter had to keep stopping for clarification, and the defense complained repeatedly. >> give your answers as slowly and clearly and as loudly as you can. >> reporter: she painted a picture of a teenager feeling threatened, and on the run from a strange man. >> i asked him how the man looked like. he looked like a creepy ass cracker. >> let me make sure we got that. creepy -- >> ass cracker. >> yeah. is that what you recall him saying? >> yes. >
CNN
Jun 29, 2013 1:00am PDT
trayvon martin was on top, correct? >> correct. >> and he was raining blows on the person on the bottom, george zimmerman, right? >> that's what it looked like. >> reporter: he was watching from his patio about 15 to 20 feet away. zimmerman that night was wearing a red and blackjack et, martin a dark hooded sweatshirt. >> the color of clothing on top, what could you see? >> it was dark. >> okay. how about the color of clothing on the bottom. >> i believe it was white or red color. >> reporter: that's not all good says she saw. he witnessed physical blows being thrown and mix the marshall arts. >> what you saw was the person on top in an mma style straddle position, correct? >> correct. >> that was further described, was it not, as being ground and pound? >> correct. >> reporter: good also testified about one more key question, that voice screaming for help in the darkness he believes belonged to zimmerman. >> the voice screaming for help however many times that you heard it, it was just one person's joyce? >> when i heard it outside? i believe it was just one person's voice, yes.
FOX News
Jun 28, 2013 12:00pm PDT
. their own witness says the teenager, trayvon martin, was on top in the scuffle that unfolded before the neighborhood watchman shot him dead. the father of the fugitive surveillance leaker ed snowden says he is confident his son could soon return to the united states but there's a huge catch. >> president obama spoke about possibly visiting the civil rights icon nelson mandela, who remains in critical condition in a south african hospital. we'll explain why activists are demanding obama get out of south africa. all ahead unless breaking news changes everything on "studio b." >> first from fox at 3:00, another key witness for the prosecution in the george zimmerman murder trial, painting a vivid picture of the violence suffered just moments before the shooting that killed trayvon martin, and he said that one person was on top of the other, and that he could see the colors of their clothing. >> the color of clothing on top, what could you see? >> it was dark. >> how about the color of clothing at the bottom? >> i believe it was a light white or red color. >> so that means the teenager,
CNN
Jun 27, 2013 8:00pm PDT
straight day of cross-examination for trayvon martin's friend who was on the phone with him when the confrontation unfolded. rachel jeantel probably made an impression on you and some think maybe the wrong impression on jurors. today, there appeared to be changes. more on the attitude adjustment and all the other big developments tonight from martin savidge. >> reporter: round two of the clash in the courtroom between the star witness and veteran defense attorney. it started out nice enough, rachel jeantel seemed to have adopted a more respectful tone. >> yes, sir. >> reporter: but it wasn't long before her yes, sirs seemed to take on a sharper edge. >> yes, sir. >> reporter: defense attorney don west was out to discredit her testimony that george zimmerman was the aggressor and pointed to numerous changes in her story in previous accounts including a letter to trayvon's mother, describing what she heard. in it, she left out trayvon's derogatory racial language. >> you specifically chose not to tell ms. fulton that's what trayvon said. >> no. >> because you thought it would hurt her
MSNBC
Jul 1, 2013 1:00pm PDT
being smothered? i don't hear it and i don't hear trayvon martin. we noefl george zimmerman testified specific things he said martin was saying to him. how significant is that? >> i don't know about you, but i'm glad to hear george zimmerman have to answer tough questions. i've been watching every bit of this trial. this is the first time that he had to sit and answer some very difficult questions about the case. i think especially the question about smothering is really important because george zimmerman says he was screaming. he was screaming for help. that's him on that 911 call, right? well, if he's being smothered, if trayvon martin's hands are over his nose and mouth, how is he screaming? i think that's an outstanding point made by detective serrino. what was the provocation for martin punching had im? that's always been a weak part of his story. he says he came around and out of nowhere after a brief bit of conversation, what's your problem? >> i don't have a problem. you have a problem now. bam, trayvon martin punched him hard in the face. that seems hard to believe.
MSNBC
Jul 5, 2013 11:00am PDT
you a picture of trayvon martin's fingernails, you wouldn't know whether or not they looked the same that day. >> the fingernail has to connect to trayvon's head for me even to identify. >> i'm talking about the condition -- what the fingernails looked like. if i showed you a picture, that wouldn't do you any good because you have no memory. >> yes. >> is that correct? >> i do not have any memory. i told you before, i told you right now. i do not remember anything. >> part of the protocol also includes fingernail clippings, correct? >> it's not my protocol. it's not my job. it's technician's job. they are trained to do that. >> don't you supervise the technicians? >> i supervise them. >> don't you make sure they do their job completely and correctly? >> i have confidence on them. they are trained to do their job. i cannot keep my eye on them when i do autopsy. i do autopsy, my hands is gloves, my hands is bloody. >> are you doing an autopsy with bloody, gloved hands when the fingernails are scraped? >> no. i look at them before we do autopsy. >> sure, and -- >> and after we look at i
FOX News
Jun 29, 2013 1:00am PDT
i'm harris. two seconds the factor. >> laura: the o'reilly factor is on. tonight: >> what you saw was the person on top mma style straddle position, correct? >> correct. >> laura: bombshell testimony today at the george zimmerman/trayvon martin murder trial. >> the person who you now know to be trayvon martin was on top, correct? >> correct. >> as a key witness takes the stand, we will have complete courtroom analysis. >> anybody who tries to inject race into it is wrong. >> laura: after trayvon martin's friend uses racially charged language on the witness stand the martin family lawyer suddenly claims race is not a factor in the case, but it wasn't always that way. >> he was executed for wwb, nagc. walking while black in a gated community. >> we have a debate. >> if there is someone saw what i worked for and they had wanted it. >> laura: paula deen's cookbooks are flying off the shelves as her fans race to her defense. is this the beginning of a come back for the star chef? caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> laura: hi, i'm laura ingraham in for bill o'reilly. racial tensions in the trayvon martin trial that the subject of this evening's talking points memo. you probably heard testimony of rachel jeantel who was on the phone with him right before he was shot by george zimmerman. on a few key points, her story has changed from what she originally told authorities. she described zimmerman this way, according to what martin told her. >> she said the man looked creepy. >> creepy white, cracker. >> they are having trouble hearing you. take your time. >> creepy ass cracker. >> you are saying in the culture that you live in, in your community, people call people there call white people crackers? >> yes, sir. >> and do they use the "n" word regularly? >> yes, sir. >> she went on to say that she didn't think this was racist. for many nonblacks this was shocking to hear. after all paula deen has been excoriated for the last week and lost most of hers business interest for admitting to using the "n" word in the past. yet liberal defenders of ms. jeantel took to the internet and cable to scold white america for failing to understand her point of view. she may not be sophisticated but she is authentic in the black culture the argument goes. folks, this is insane. so it's a cultural badge of honor to demean and degrade based on skin color if you are a person of color? or are those who are going out of their way to excuse ms. jeantel's comments just suffering from an overdose of white guilt? in other words, we have to excuse her poor manners, her disrespectful language and cocky ignorance because she is black? it's all part of the culture william raspberry called it once the ghetto okay crazy. left wing elites fall over themselves to criticize behavior black use that they would never tolerate from most upper crust white kids like the use of the "n" word or f word or c word. when that maps chill out. it's all part of the culture we hear or the kids who wear saggy pants around their thighs, big deal. what if they insult the police? can you blame them? well, what if they can't read cursive? look, most kids today struggle with cursive. this is an example of what danielle patrick moynahan called the soft bigotry of low expectations. everyone from tom sowell to bill cosby pointed out when we set a low bar for people they never end up rising above it there are a lot of complicated issues bubbling up during this trial, but every young person, regarding will of skin color should have a family who teaches right from wrong and also an education that provides the basic skills necessary to communicate clearly and correctly. so making excuses for poor performance and lousy manners because of skin color just keeps kids stuck in a cycle of under achievement and resentment. we're all better than that and that's the memo. we'll have more on the racial element of the trial a bit later in the program. first, the top story tonight. the latest from inside the courtroom today where a key witness described the intense events leading up to the deadly shooting of trayvon martin. including what looked like a mixed martial arts fight between martin and george zimmerman. >> what you saw was the person on top in an mma style straddle position, correct? >> correct. >> it was further described, was it not, as being ground and pound? >> correct. >> the person who you now know to be trayvon martin was on top, correct? >> correct. >> and he was the one who was raining blows down on the person on the bottom george zimmerman, right? >> that's what it looked like. >> i'm not asking for 1 herks% accuracy i'm asking for 1 common sense. if that was george zimmerman's voice screaming the person on the bottom. >> that's my. >> did you ever see him slam the person's head on the concrete over and over and over? >>. no. >> did you see at any time the person on top grab the person on the bottom's head and slam it into the concrete? >> no. >> joining us now from los angeles anahita and from new york jonah spilbore, both are attorneys. anahita, let's start with you, that was some testimony, of course, from the neighbor, mr. good, who said he witnessed what looked like this -- like mixed martial arts pound and ground moment. how devastating was that to the prosecution? >> the entire day today was another disaster, laura, for the prosecution. i mean, after listening to two days of the other star witness for the prosecution rachel jeantel, i didn't think it could get any worse but it did today. you really have to question what is the prosecution doing? what is their strategy? this is their case in chief. this is their time to put on evidence and put on witnesses that support their theory of the case. and what we have seen so far, again, with this particular witness john good is that these witnesses are actually supporting the defense's position in this case. and i think the two points that this john good testified to today point by point corroborate zimmerman's version of events. i don't think the defense could have put on a better witness today quite frankly. >> laura: johnna, i was flipping on. i thought wow, the defense is already putting on their witnesses. did i not realize initially this was a prosecution witness and then we'll move on to the other part of the day. this was quite stunning. i mean, it wasn't the little -- you know, little child that we saw in a lot of those pictures at least the description if we're led to believe that that was trayvon martin on top of zimmerman, quote, straddling him with that position. >> this is true. i have to agree with both you, john good's testimony today was actually very good for the defense. unfortunately, is he a prosecution witness. however, the prosecutor was able to get some nuggets from him such as he did not witness george zimmerman's head being slammed against the sidewalk, okay. he actually testified that he didn't really see contact between the person who was on top, his fist to somebody else's face. he didn't see that let's remember one thing. today is not the only day of the testimony. and if you take john god's testimony and you compare it to a couple of the witnesses yesterday though ho saw the version of events from a different time perspective, now you have got some of them saying wait a minute, i thought it was george zimmerman on top. today john good saying i think it was trayvon martin on top. it's not a slam dunk for george zimmerman, even though today's testimony was damaging for the prosecution. >> laura: anahita, then we have the neighbor who also is featured today. and the neighbor made the call, was going to make the call to zimmerman's wife because zimmerman gets cuffed at the scene. and the neighbor said well zimmerman seemed very calm and said just tell her that i shot somebody. i don't know what that ended up proving or helping the prosecution or not. to me it was not all that exciting that part of it. >> exactly, laura. i agree with everything you have said so far. i think that was totally irrelevant. it doesn't go to prove anything. again what your other getion said helps the defense. doubt now. the defense has been able to show reasonable doubt. some witnesses saying they saw one thing. john good who testified today incidentally the only witness who actually walked outside and saw some the altercation take place say that he saw another. that's built in reasonable doubt. that is a victory for the defense right there and we have to question again, what is the prosecution's strategy? you would have to speculate the reason they put john good on the stand because i too laura, when i put on the television today thought i was watching the defense witness today. but you would have to think they are doing this to sort of diffuse the blow, knowing that his testimony was going to hurt them and show the jurors, you know, we are not really hiding anything from you. but it back fired. because he, again, point by point corroborated george zimmerman's version of events. >> counselor, thanks so much. and up next, geraldo rivera will weigh in on the zimmerman trial. and the latest on the nfl star accused of murder. we're coming right back. >> laura: in the fridays with herald segment tonight. two hot topics including thoughts on the zimmerman trial. we first start with nfl tightend aaron hernandez who was charged with the execution style murder of his friend last week. is he now also being investigateed of two other men last year. however, back in april, hernandez was still portraying himself as a role model. >> you are obviously a favorite in the hispanic community. what what ways you can give back to the community? >> i just try to be a role model. when i see hispanics that look up to me i try to lead them this the right direction and hopefully it gives a lot of hispanics out there to be a drive to be successful. there is not that many hispanics in the nfl and it's just an honor to be one. >> laura: despite the fact that hernandez is being held without bail, he still has his fans. [chanting] >> laura: joining us from new york, fox news anchor geraldo rivera. well, herald, is he innocent until proven guilty. these nfl players all have their cadre of hard core fans. that doesn't surprise me all thatch. does it surprise you? >> he is a deep disappointment to me, laura. i must say. and what is most interesting in watching the clip in april of his installing the virtue of playing it it straight on the straight and narrow to the fans there that was two months after he allegedly shot a florida man in the eye, taking the eyeball out. he has now been sued for that i was never arrested because the allegation is that the complainant, the person he shot in the eye in february, this is before the homicides. the alleged homicides that the person was this drug dealer down in florida. this is a thug. he has tattoos. the blood and the crypts. he was a member of the bristol connecticut bloods. he has got tattoos. gang markings everywhere. they took the hood the thug out of the hoods. they went to the nfl and got a 40-million-dollar five year contract and guess what, he kept hanging around with the same malcontent. now he is facing the not only the murder charge for lloyd. the person he allegedly assassinated mob style but he is also suspected in the murders a year ago unsolved drive by a bmw pulls up and kills two guys on a boston street corner. unsolved homicide. and that is with his very possible that aaron hernandez is the first mass murderer that we know of in the nfl, laura. >> laura: he was really radioactive to a lot of people early on in the process during the draft yet the patriots decided to take a chance on hernandez. now the article written today in the sports world were is this the end of this era for the patriots? i don't really know what that means. people are wondering did they not see anything? plargs he had talked to said he was perfectly fine teammate. he got along with everybody. he didn't show any signs of this and he was basically well liked. i don't think he was tom bread well liked but he was well liked. >> whether he was tom brady i don't know. in florida he was problematic. it's ironic that here you have hernandez and tim tebow come off the same florida team that won the national championship. you have the most, you know, holly and straight arrow of all players in tebow and aaron hernandez who admitted he came from the hood and as i said the bristol bloods but with hernandez it doesn't seem he ever shook his past. he reportedly failed several blood tests. he hung around with these people from bristol, connecticut from his old neighborhood. it just seemed to me hanging out in night clubs, going around, you know, carrying a weapon. it seems to me that hernandez was a dyed in the wool gang banger who got an awful lot of money and couldn't use that money to change his delightful very much. >> laura: let's move on to the zimmerman trial, heard. i know you have been following it closely. among yesterday's testimony ms. jeantel got the country talking. her demeanor on the stand. the use of the word cracker and the "n" word and so forth. what's your take away on that and what happened today? >> i disagree with you somewhat in terms of rachel jeantel. i get her and she seemed to me in her own rough and unpolished way to be very sincere. i thought that she was, you know, a witness who certainly on the -- you know, in terms of her recalcitrance and defiance was difficult the first day. you can't blame her forth not being able to read cursive. >> laura: she changed her story. >> she did change her story. even in the con dex of that, yes, she is sitting next to the victim's mom and she is going easy on what she said, you know, in that context. can i understand that. i can also understand how she would feel, you know, it's us against the world. i feel that she has really been pillarried in a way that perhaps is unfair. i thought don west the attorney went too far. they had her the second day. they should have let her go before they started banging her so badly that they generated some sympathy. >> laura: he wants to win the case. it's not about jeantel. >> let me hesitate to add that george zimmerman is clearly winning this case. >> laura: he is going to win. this virtually impossible, given the testimony today that had zimmerman on his back being pounded by trayvon. >> laura: that's doubt. that's reasonable doubted. >> how reprehensible morally speaking george zimmerman may have been for provoking this incident. i think it's absolutely clear that self-defense applies here and zimmerman will be acquitted, laura. >> laura: all right. thank you, geraldo. more on the zimmerman trial later on. but, when we come right back, will irs official lois lerner be forced to testify about the conservative targeting scandal? we'll have the latest and, later, lawyers for trayvon martin's family now say race is not a factor in the case. it wasn't always that way. we'll have a report coming up. >> laura: in the factor follow up segment tonight, you may remember irs senior official lois lerner took the fifth amendment when she testified before congress last month about the political targeting scandal. but today the house oversight committee voted that she waived that privilege clause because she made a brief statement before invoking the fifth amendment. the resolution finding lois lerner waived her fifth amendment provision on may 22nd, 2013 is approved. >> i'm not trying to make this more difficult than it should be. it's just that i think that when he would are dealing with -- i'm very sensitive to this constitution. because i wouldn't be here if it wasn't for it. >> lois lerner is, in fact, a poster child for thumbing her nose, a federal bureau craft thumbing her nose at congress. >> laura: learn his or her is on paid administrative leave could be called back to the committee and be held in contempt if she refuses to testify. with us now to analyze julianne epstein a democratic strategist. all right, it was on party lines they voted as i said to waive the privilege. dershowitz today, at alan dershowitz the esteemed harvard law professor says she risks being held in contempt of congress for her actions. he didn't think it looks like there was reasonable for her to invehicle the fifth amendment. if she doesn't come back and testify, she could find herself in a heap of trouble. >> she could find herful? a contempt proceeding. remember, just for context, the reason why she invoked the fifth amendment, i think is at least in part because darrell issa the chairman of the committee accused her of a crime. said she had committed false statements. then the question is the legal question. interesting question is once she protests her innocence, remember, unlike a courtroom, in a congressional hearing you have to appear to invoke your fifth amendment rights. once you protest your innocence, you have waived that right? notwithstanding the comments of allen dershowitz the quinn case going back to the 1950s which suggests that she didn't. in that case you had a lot of conversation going back between the witness and the committee there and it was held that the witness at that point' did not waive the right. >> laura: in june 2011 she first knew that the terms were going to be used to review the 501 c 4 tea party, patriot and so forth it wasn't until this year, that she basically apologized for this having happened under her watch. as she was giving a speech at an aba meeting. why would it take that long for her to realize that this was a bad thing to do? >> i think that's an excellent question. and i certainly wouldn't defend that i think that the committee, i think one thing that you can say, there certain solid darrell issa said earlier this week there is no evidence that attaches any of this want to white house or the president's political staff. i think it is a fair criticism to say as you point out in yourthat once thef knew about this and they were asked about it by congressional officials that they should have given all the information that they knew then we don't have all the answers to the questions that you asked that is a very relevant question. if in fact in june of 2011 she knew that there was targeting. targeting not just of conservative groups but of some other groups as well as we learned earlier this week. if she knew of that and failed to disclose that i do think that's a problem. >> we found out the ig what is his name j russell george by the way put to lie yesterday this idea that the progressive word was used as a search term to, again, slow down or slow walk delay any of these petitions. the idea that the liberals were subjected to the same type of treatment that wasn't the case. a lot of these liberal groups got approval. a few were delayed a little bit. there wasn't that kind of equal burden being put on liberals versus conservatives that story got out that wasn't a true story. >> i would agree two thirds of what you said. >> laura: you are agreeing too much with me by the way. >> there was about 15 different lists, screening lists. and some of them did include liberal and progressive groups. but for the most part the enhanced screening or targeting was done on the conservative groups. >> laura: lavish parties, spending. another guy take the fifth. >> a lot of these groups on left and right should have never qualified because they were engaged in political activity. >> laura: what students they were tutoring. very intrusive. i think they have lost so much credibility to the extent that the irs has much credibility. >> the new irs regulations on this are bad as well. engage 40% of your time in political activity. you still qualify for the status. that's wrong as well. >> laura: julian, it's good to he see you. race and the george zimmerman trayvon martin murder trial. some surprising remarks by defenders of the victim. we'll may you the tape. later, paula deen's new cookbook hitting number one on the best seller list each as companies dump her. county controversial chef make a come back? make a come back? we hope you stay tuned to i'm tony siragusa and i'm training guys who leak a little, to guard their manhood with new depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com >> laura: in the unresolved problem segment tonight. the senate voted 62 to 38 to pass immigration reform which would allow most illegals the chance to become u.s. citizens. the legislation now heads to the house where it will be met with intense opposition. >> the house is not going to take up and vote on whatever the senate passes. we're going to do our own bill through regular order and it will be legislation that will reflects the will of our majority and the will of the american people. and for any legislation, including the conference report, to pass the house that's going to have to be a bill that has the support of a majority of our members. >> laura: with us now, alfonso who is the executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles. alfonso, good to see you, it's going to be a tough road it looks like in the house of representatives for this bill but we will see. anything can happen. why is this bill good for low skilled and poor americans who are struggling to make ends meet. struggling to make a living wage. struggling to keep their family together under really severe economic pressures? >> well, i think it doesn't threaten them at all. if anything, we need more work visas, the guest worker program created by the senate immigration bill is actually extremely small. one of the reasons rand paul voted against the immigration bill is because it doesn't create a workable market base guest worker program. if american companies cannot find american workers, they should be able to bring in the foreign workers that they need. government should not tell them. >> >> laura: so with 7.6 unemployment today you content that businesses are finding a complete labor shortage major sectors of our economy. a conservative unquestioned conservative principles says the real free market would require businesses to pay higher wages. a lot of people who give though these a lot of these groups support amnesty or immigration reform. a lot of them are fund by big business interest who have a vested interest in keeping wages low he. that adversely effects latinos in this country. african-americans and the working poor. >> but is he actually the current system that it is unfair to american low skilled workers because right now. american companies can hire undocumented workers at wages below minimum or prevailing wage. if you actually legalize those workers, they are going to be order minimum wage or prevailing wage so they're not going to have an unfair advantage over low skilled workers. >> laura: they are going to be competing across every job sector. when you say 23 million. alfonso you are smart. this is not rocket science. 43 million new people working here in this country. i don't blame those people for wanting to work here at all. i don't blame them at all. i blame the politicians who say we have to do this for business. we have to do this for the latino vote. how about the american people? not the rich because they are not going to be affected. they will get their yards cleaned and houses taken care of and kids taken care of this. is going to hurt the people who work really hard. >> that's not true. >> laura: for republicans to stand against big business that's a death nell for the republican party. >> that's a position that goes against a free market and conservative principles. >> laura: no, a real free market would have no borders, alfonso. >> you are assuming they are taking jobs away from americans, they are not. >> laura: callers to my radio show absolutely 100% unequivocally say it's happening across the board now. >> that's wrong. they are taking jobs americans don't want. >> laura: because americans are, what? ladies lazy. >> no americans of working age. this is a population issue. our population is growing below the replacement rate. >> laura: you are doing jeb bush not having babies things. >> that's part of it. >> laura: latinos are starting to contra september more. >> we need healthy population growth. we need low skilled workers. >> laura: low skilled people in this country are the ones struggling the most now. struggle less with more competition. >> we will have that workforce that we need and we will have less jobs for americans. >> laura: well, we shall see. but it has to get through the house of representatives. and boehner -- >> -- they can fix it. >> laura: they can fix it now they have obama care. obama care they can hire foreign workers over obama care. obama care penalty will not have to be paid for foreign workers, do you know that? >> nothing to do with obama care. >> obama care is not happy senate bill because of the guest worker program. >> laura: employers will be incentivized to hire foreign workers alfonso because they don't have the obama care penalty. >> weak unions. >> laura: i appreciate it thank you very much. defenders of trayvon martin no longer want race to play a role in the murder trial. what why the sudden alec, for this mission i upgraded your smart phone. ♪ right. but the most important feature of all is... the capital one purchase eraser. i can redeem the double miles i earned with my venture card to erase recent travel purchases. d with a few clicks, this mission never happened. uh, what's this button do? [ electricity zaps ] ♪ you requested backup? yes. yes i did. what's in your wallet? >> the o'reilly factor. the number one cable news show for 13 years running. >> thanks for staying with us, i'm laura ingraham in for bill o'reilly. the impact segment tonight, the role of race in the george zimmerman murder trial. yesterday, trayvon martin's family attorney made this startling announcement. >> i want to make it very clear to this family, race is not a part of this process. and anybody who tries to inject race into it is wrong. >> however, shortly after the shooting, advocates for the martin family made it clear that they thought race and skin color did play a role that night. >> he was executed for wwb wwbnagc, walking while black in a gated community. >> trayvon was hunted down like a rabid dog. he was shot in the street. he was racially profiled. >> joining us now from new york is michael skull neck. is he a close friend of the martin family and co-president of the global grind.com. and the entertainment and culture web site and from l.a., politics and race commentator jasmine canick. let's start with you. i'm going back and reading al sharpton's column that he wrote in the spring of last year. why race matters in the trayvon martin tragedy. but now a year plus later, the defense, i mean, the prosecution is telling us well, basically this is not a racial thing and we don't want to inject race into this. i say isn't that a little late. >> let's be very clear, laura. mother of trayvon martin has said very loud and very clear this is not a black or white thing. it's a right or wrong thing. certainly this issue of travon martin's death has brought up issues of race. what happens in the courtroom no one, no one from the family, no one from the prosecutor, the prosecutor has ever said that george zimmerman killed trayvon martin because he was black. nobody said that. >> don't have to say that by the way i should clarify it wasn't the prosecution that said that it was trayvon martin's family attorney that had made that point. but, you know, you don't have to say that it was done because of race, jasmine to have this be racially continuinged. and i think from the beginning, when you had cable hosts running down there and declaring this, you know a big race case and hosting shows from down there and having, you know, their own little rallies and so forth, this was, and still is to some extent, you know, a racially polarizing case. you cannot get away from that. >> yeah. you have to respect the opinions of the family and the attorney. but at some point i think this has gotten a little bit away from them. they have no control over whether or not it's a race issue at this point anymore. i think a lot of for instance see it as being a race issue. much similar as to when the president ran in 2008, he didn't want his run to be looked at as the black and white or the first black president '. but it became that we have sort of morphed into that right now. i think the media has a lot to do with that as well. >> and michael, when we first heard about this case, we saw the picture of trayvon as a much younger boy and the indication was that mr. zimmerman was white. and so it was a white guy killing a black teenager. and on its face it sounds terrible. but in the end i guess he is not officially white. he is designated as hispanic. and travon martin. >> hispanic is not a race. >> it's the description of him would be hispanic. as reported today. and that trayvon martin, you know, he was a teenager and he h you know, he had friends and he had interests and he had some, you know, he had some disciplinary issues like a lot of kids do. >> and so did george. >> and so did he, exactly. >> restraining order against his wife domestic violence and arrested for assaulting a police officer. let's talk about somebody's past. george zimmerman is the one on trial. travon martin is not the trial. and george zimmerman came to a fight -- to a fist fight with a gun and killed unarmed teenager. >> laura: you have to prove that in a court of law. can you get all emotional here on the show. can you get all upset but you have to prove it within -- obviously within a reasonable doubt. beyond a reasonable doubt. jadz minute today in court, we had another person testify, supposed to be a prosecution witness. and this prosecution witness came out of his house, looked down at the scene, and described the scene. that was not helpful to the prosecution's case. showed, you know, as he described it, it was like, you know, a pound and ground kind of thing. ww, you know, style fighting. radical fight scene and, you know, the implication is that, you know, this guy might have been acting in self-defense. you don't have to prove he was acting in self-defense. you just have to raise some doubt about it. >> look, this is far from being over. we have heard from a couple of witnesses. we will hear from a lot more. i think it's a little too soon to start to figure out if doubt has been established or not. i think that rachel was a great, great witness. and i think that as we move forward we will hear from other people. >> laura: how was she a great witness? >> she was an excellent witness. she was an excellent witness. she stuck to her story. she stuck. >> laura: she changed her story. >> whether or not people understood -- whether or not people understood what she was saying, she stuck with it and she told the truth from her perspective. >> laura. >> laura: she changed her story. i understood everything she said. >> she -- >> laura: guys, she is not on trial. it's just that she is a witness for the prosecution. and she ultimately will be helpful or not helpful to the prosecution. that's all that's involved with, you know, ms. jeantel. >> i think she was very helpful for the prosecution because she proved. >> exactly. she was great. >> he was the aggressor. >> that's right. >> laura: michael and jasmine i think her credibility got absolutely hammered yesterday. we will see. directly ahead, fans of paula deen are racing to buy her cookbooks, the companies who cut her loose are proving less forgiving. we will analyze the situation coming up. >>> in a personal story segment tonight, despite a growing list of companies severing ties with paula deen today, both sears and jcpenney announce they are cutting ties, the fans continue to stand by her and the two cookbooks are number one and number two on amazon best-seller list, despite the fact that one of the books won't be released until october. what is behind the surge in sales? and this is the start of a comeback already? joining us is entertainment attorney crystal mccreary. there always seemeds to be a second act in celebritidom, politics, sports. are we beginning see this with paula deen? companies are saying no thanks. >> she has the we support paula deen facebook page with thousands and thousands of followers. an iconic beloved figure, who has spent years building a career and following, they won't just jump ship because of this happening. and, you know, the fact that the statements were made, you know, at least in her deposition, she said they were made a few decades ago. as an african-american, an american woman, i don't like hearing her saying that she used the "n" word. the issue is what is in her heart. none of us know what is in paula deen's heart. it may not have been her intent to offend anybody. i have met her on an occasion, spent some time with her. she's from that era. you have to look defect aat the and take this opportunity to not look at herself as a victim in this, but to begin a discussion, a meaningful and constructive discussion that discusses how words have power, particularly something as racially divisive as the "n" word. as a parent, as a mother, as a citizen who has brown children running around, i don't want to have my kids have someone call them -- i don't like them hearing that word. >> crystal, it's kind of interesting, not to go back to the zimmerman thing, but given what we learned and what we know about urban culture and the way youth talk, sometimes black youth came out in the trial, the "n" word, cracker, all this stuff. >> sure. >> and people saying that's okay because that's authentic and that's the way the kids talk. they are words and powerful, and whether it's paula deen or some kid from chicago, you know, we all have to be really a little bit more sensitive and understanding of how demeaning this is to everyone. >> sure. >> demeaning to her, demeaning to african-americans, demeaning to the kids who are hearing this stuff, in music or from anywhere else. >> not her finest moment, i'm sure she feels horrible about it for a number of reasons, but the fact of the matter is, we do have to have accountability. >> well, and i think what we're seeing now is people are saying, okay, is this really who she is? did she say it 20 years ago? not excusing it, but do you throw away an entire career when we see other celebrities who make incredible comebacks. >> she is coming back. you cannot negate what she has done in her career. cannot negate the positive she's done. i don't like it coming out, what she said, the plantation themed wedding that she wanted. she said i want a plantation themed wedding, and people were enslaved. >> i don't know that's true. someone tweeted me that's not true. it seems bizarre. >> it came up in the deposition, that she actually said that she wanted a plantation themed wedding. >> are we being too hard on rachel jeantelor paula deen -- >> it's a teachable moment. >> appreciate it. >>> when we come back, a fox news exclusive on the benghazi situation. you don't want to miss this. >>> in the back of the book segment, a brand new special, benghazi, the truth behind the smoke screen, airing at 10:00 p.m. eastern on fox news channel. he explains what new investigation has been uncovered. bret, what did you uncover? >> we have gone over hundreds and hundreds of newly declassified documents and talking to people in the know. we essentially structure this hour as a new timeline, and we lay it out piece by piece. a lot of things came out in the last week with general carter ham testifying behind closed doors about the military situation and the assets available in benghazi. what we've learned, when you put this all together, it paints a picture that while there are still a lot of questions, a lot of people out there is aisaying something went wrong. we have a new interview with basili nikoula basili. he's the filmmaker. when you hear his story, it's absurd. >> the fact that this video caused the whole situation in benghazi. >> the theme, he tried to have -- he shows the movie in the vine theater in hollywood, and trying to gelt muslims to come there and get upset. the innocence of bin laden is what it's called at the time. get upset and his associate will videotape them coming out. it doesn't happen. it's absurd and so obscure, you think these two guys are at the center of what ended up being the secretary of the state and president of the united states talking about this video that wasn't getting any hits. >> and nailjailed a long period time. >> and still not getting hits on youtube. >> the suspect that was interrogated and released? we don't get any since of where the investigation is going. a lot of people involved on the attack at the compound. the murder of the ambassador and three others. >> there is a man from libya tied to the attack that has since been released. a number of people told us they know who is responsible in libya. but they are still on the lamb. why? the internal discussion is that fbi can't get to them. because of security concerns. it is really amazing when you go minute by minute and we have people in the know, we have laid it all out by the timeline and there is new details in the past week with what the military could and could not have done. >> the strangle thing, brad. 15 seconds, how long it took to get to the compound. it took weeks before they were there on the scene. >> why didn't the military go in? we were told there wasn't a stand down order. they were told to stay in tripoli. more to come. >> 10:00. can't wait. i have it dvr'd. >>> before we go, a reminder about "the factor's" mission to get every veteran a track chair. the eight highest bidders will receive this autographed photograph. if you don't get a picture, not on the hook for the donation, don't worry and if you want a facsimile photo, donate 25 bucks or more at independencefund.org to find out more about my radio show, podcasts, books, go to lauraingram.com. bill back on monday. thank you for watching tonight. i'm laura ingraham in for bill o'reilly and please remember, the spin stops here, because we're always looking out for you. have a great weekend >>> welcome to hannity. tonight, full coverage of the george zimmerman murder trial. throughout the program, highlights from day five and legal and law enforcement experts to break it down for you. first, the most shocking revelation from the day's testimony. a neighbor who witnessed the "tussle" between george zimmerman and trayvon martin. john good saw martin on top of zimmerman. watch this. >> at that point, could you tell there was one individual there at least or two people? >> i could tell there were two when they were still vertical. >> all right. and you could -- could you tell at that time in terms of describing who was on top and who was on the bottom? >> i could only see colors of
MSNBC
Jun 27, 2013 11:00am PDT
statement that mr. west asked you about that trayvon martin was running away from the person? >> yes, sir. >> and you also made reference that trayvon martin said the man -- described him as a creepy white -- >> object. object. that is at this point beyond the scope of the cross examination and not responsive to one of the issues raised during the cross and it's also leading. >> overruled to the first two objections. as to the leading, i will give a little leeway to get a frame of reference and then make sure your questions aren't leading. >> yes, your honor. my question is, do you recall mr. west asking you that trayvon martin referred to the man that was following him as a creepy white crapper? >> yes. >> objection. >> i didn't say that. that's a mischaracterization of the testimony. >> sustained because i think the words were creepy ass cracker. >> were the words -- pardon me language, were the words creepy ass cracker? >> yes, sir. >> do you recall mr. west asking you about that. >> yes, sir. >> and also -- and to you is that a derogatory -- is that the way people speak in your cultur
CNN
Jun 27, 2013 5:00pm PDT
to. i selected harvard. >> reporter: her take away from the science win, $50,000. the science win, $50,000. >>> -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >> ac 3060 starts now. >>> good evening everyone. the star witness in the george zimmerman murder trial is the star in court. the question is for which side and also unbelievable from nfl star to alleged murderer and yet, more possible trouble for aaron hernan deds. another murder investigation. a double homicide and being looked at in connection to that. more companies cutting ties with paula deen. she's reaching out to reverend jessie jackson and tells us about advice he's giving deen. >>> a second straight day of cross examination for trayvon martin's friend who was on the phone with him when the confrontation unfolded. rachel jeantel probably made an impression on you and some think maybe the wrong impression on jurors. the big developments from martin salve individual. >> reporter: wound two of the clash in the courtroom between the star witness and veteran defense attorney. it started out nice enough, rachel jeantel seemed to have adopted a more respectful tone. >> yes, sir. >> reporter: but it wasn't long before her yes, sirs seemed to take on a sharper edge. >> yes, sir. >> reporter: defense attorney don west was out to discredit her testimony that george zimmerman was the aggressor and pointed to numerous changes in her story in pref juvious accou including a letter to trayvon's mom describing what she heard and left out the derogatory language. >> you specifically chose not to tell ms. fulton that's what trayvon said. >> no. >> because you thought it would hurt her feelings, didn't you? >> no. >> you didn't think that would bother her, if you said that her son described the man that was following him in a car on the phone -- >> i didn't think. >> was a creepy ass cracker. >> i did not think that was important. >> not important enough to put in the letter. >> no. >> and not important enough to tell her. >> no. >> reporter: she said martin sounded tired on the phone like he was running but she said he was whispering because the teen was waiting to ambush zimmerman, something she denied. >> he got close to trayvon, yes, sir. >> and you don't know whether the man was approaching trayvon at that point and getting closer or whether trayvon was apprching the man and getting closer? >> trayvon would have told me he'll call me back, sir, if he was going to approach him, sir. >> so you're assuming that trayvon didn't approach the man because he would have told you if he was going to confront the guy, he would call you back when it was over? >> yes, sir. >> reporter: then west went after what could be the most damaging part of her testimony for the defense. jeantel said over the phone she heard a bump and martin say get off get off to zimmerman. >> so the last thing you heard was a noise like something hitting somebody -- trayvon got hit. trayvon got hit. >> you don't know that, do you? >> no, sir. >> you don't know that trayvon got hit -- >> he -- >> you didn't know that trayvon at that moment take his fist and drive it in george zimmerman's face, do you? >> no, sir. >> at mid afternoon as she left the witness stand, the judge reminded her that she could be called back. there may be many opinions about whether she helped or hurt the prosecution. in the end, the only ones that really matter are the six opinions in the jury box. >> martin joins us now. we heard some of what rachel jeantel said and who was at the initial interviews who she spoke with police. why was that so important? >> reporter: this is something the defense is trying to bring up, there was a very close relationship between the prosecution and trayvon martin's family, but also, their attorney benjamin crump. in fact, when the initial interview took place with authorities, that young lady was sitting in the home of trayvon martin's mother and seated next to her when she gave that first testimony was sabrina, trayvon martin's mother. so they are trying to imply that her testimony could have actually been encouraged or somehow interfered with just by having trayvon's mother right next to her. >> another witness called is jenna lower. jurors heard her call, the gunshots. what did she say that was so important? >> that's the thing, what she had to say really was not so important. she didn't bring such dynamic or anything new, but of course her call everybody knows. if she hadn't made the call at the time she did. you never would have caught the gunshot and the screams that are at the center of such a huge debate in this case. it allowed for her call to be introduced, but she really didn't bring too much. >> thanks very much. we'll take a more look at rachel jeantel's da meaner and she was the prosecution's star witness. let's remember that. as you saw in martin's report, they tried to use her to flip the prosecution's racial narrative on it's head trying to suggest the victim, trayvon martin, was racist, take a look. >> what is one thing about what trayvon martin told you that made you think this was racial? >> describing the person. >> pardon me? >> describing the person -- >> i just didn't -- >> describing the person that was watching him and following him. >> i see. >> sir. >> and that's because he described him as a creepy ass cracker? >> yes. >> so it was racial, but it was because trayvon martin put race in this? >> no. >> you don't think that's a racial comment? >> no. >> you don't think that creepy ass cracker is a racial comment? >> no. >> let's dig deeper with the team of legal pros. sunny, what do you think of those comments? the defense spent a lot of time on the subject of race today with rachel jeantel implying it was trayvon martin that put race into the discussion but using that term. >> that didn't make a lot of sense to me given the fact the defense fought so hard from keeping the prosecution from saying racial profiling and victorious in that. so they have taken what was the elephant in the room and painted it bright pink and everyone is talking about it. it didn't make a lot of sense to me strategically. what didn't work is okay, fine, those were trayvon martin's words, disparking and unkind but used it as a description for george zimmerman. she just repeated what trayvon martin said and since they weren't kind words it made her more credible because she's not trying to sugar coat anything. she's not trying to make him sound better. she's not saying he side a white gentleman was following me. she used his words and made her more credible. >> do you think it made her credible using the word cracker is not a racial team? >> yeah, and that's something i've been thinking about. i grew up in the northeast. it wasn't a term i was familiar with at all. for her she described it not as racial but a descriptive term. he was a white man, a creepy. >> he was a cracker -- what are you -- >> yeah, she used it as a descriptor -- >> are you actually saying it makes her more credible because she accurately described him as a cracker? is that where you're going with that? >> no you're mischart rising what i said, i said because she's not trying to sugar coat what trayvon martin said. >> the argument -- her argument that it's not a racial term, does that matter? does the jury care? >> yeah and here is why. not so much because she used a racist term but because we're talking about getting a glimpse into trayvon martin's mind and the jury is all about relatebility. we can talk about taking it easy on a young witness. we can talk about economics and racism, classes, at the end of the day, jurors look for relatebility. who do i relate to? when you relate to someone, you find them credible. it has nothing to do with an opinion one race is better than the other. it has nothing to do with that. when somebody talks, are they someone i can relate to? the jurors will ask is this somebody at a cocktail party, would i use that? do i view the word cracker the way this person views it? can i relate to this person? >> sunny, your argument she is authentically being herself and not trying to pretend to be something she's not and using terms danny would not use at a cocktail party, you're actually saying that makes her relateble. >> it makes her relateble because she used the terms martin used with her. she could do what she did when she wrote the letter to sybrina fulton and left that out. she says trayvon told her, now if she wanted to make trayvon look like an angel or wanted to make trayvon look a certain way, if that he shougt that would be harmful, she could say trayvon told me there was a white gentleman following him or a white guy following him. no, she used that term and said that's what he used -- >> hold on -- >> and i think a juror will find that more credible. >> sunny, you're making a good point she was sugar coating it and that's exactly what she did in her original statement, she left out -- she just called the guy creepy. she said trayvon called the guy creepy and later on admits she left out cracker originally because she wanted to sugar coat it. she didn't want -- trayvon's mom was there and she didn't want her to hear the language of cracker and aware it's the bad word. she didn't say it. she is relating that somebody said that word but, i mean, she's not being -- she's admitted that she sugar coated on prosecution. >> danny, for someone who was the prosecution's star witness, do you think she damaged the prosecution's case? do you think she helped the defense? >> she was an entity because she's interesting, but as far as advancing the prosecution's ball, you go to the elements. what do they have to prove? after this witness's testimony what did we learn? she's hazy on things and can't relate to her for a number of reasons. if you can read cursive you can't relate to this person. so you say well, i may not find her credible, not that she's lying, just that i don't think she was able to perceive and hear these things and if you take everything she says as true, where does is that leave us, that someone said -- the man said get off me at best but maybe later on maybe they didn't say that, trayvon thought somebody was following me. trayvon said, why are you following me? i don't know if we're left with anything that advances the prosecution's ball. >> i want to play something a neighbor of george zimmerman that made the into mouse phone call. i want to listen to that. >> i can't see him. i don't want to go out there. i don't know what is going on, so. >> tell them to come. >> their sending. >> so so you think he's yelling help? >> yes. >> at. what is your -- >> just -- there's gunshots. >> who is calling for help is a big contention. did either side sway the jury who is on that call? >> i don't think so. i think the only thing that is important at this point in the trial is now that evidence is in front of the jury. we know the voice experts won't testify but someone from trayvon martin's family, they will get on the witness stand and identify the voices as -- the cries as coming from him. i suspect someone from george zimmerman's family and the defense case will come forward and say this is george zimmerman's voice. many of the witnesses so far have said it sounded like a boy's voice, it sounds like a young person's voice. it's up to the jury to decide. the ground work is laid for a showdown between the families and that will be fascinating to watch. >> sunny and danny, appreciate it. they will join me at 10:00 for the hour-long ac 360 special report. the key moments, we'll replay them and have the panel back. what do you think about the trial, what you saw today? we'll turn to the reluctant and combative sometimes witness rachel jeantel. >>> and later, aaron hernandez charged with first-degree murder, you know this, he's also being investigated in connection with another case, a double homicide, details on that ahead. 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"dedication: that's the real walmart" ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] if you can't stand the heat, get off the test track. get the mercedes-benz you've been burning for at the summer event, going on now at your authorized mercedes-benz dealer. hurry, before this opportunity cools off. there's a new way to fight litter box odor. going on now at your authorized mercedes-benz dealer. introducing tidy cats with glade tough odor solutions. two trusted names, one amazing product. hoo-hoo...hoo-hoo. hoo-hoo hoo. sir... i'll get it together i promise... heeheehee. jimmy: ronny, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? ronny: i'd say happier than the pillsbury doughboy on his way to a baking convention. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >>> welcome back. every big trial these days seems to have one witness that becomes something of a sensation. in this trial, as millions have seen, that witness is trayvon martin's friend rachel jeantel. she's like the case herself -- itself poll rising. today she seemed to be at times less combative, not always as you see in this exchange with don west that starts with yes, sir but builds to something stronger. take a look. >> he told me the dude was close to him. >> right, at that point he decided to approach this man and say why are you following me? >> yes, sir. >> and he could have just run home -- >> he was already by his house. he told me. >> of course, you don't know if he was telling you the truth of not. >> why he need to lie about that, sir? >> maybe if he decided to assault george zimmerman, he didn't want you to know that. >> that's real retarded, sir. >> i'm sorry? >> that's real retarded sir. trayvon did not know him. >> rachel jeantel today, her second day in the spotlight. her performance on the stand more polished than yesterday rising eyebrows and as randi kaye reports, none of that intention is welcome. >> reporter: rachel jeantel never wanted any of this, no media glare, no attention, and no tough questions about her phone call with trayvon martin moments before he was shot. that may be why she lied about her age. >> did you say that you were 16 so that you could try to maintain more privacy? >> yes. >> so you wanted to make yourself seem like a minor, so that maybe there wouldn't be as much public disclosure as if you said your true age of 18? >> yes. >> reporter: today rachel jeantel is 19, and her life story from what we can piece together is more exposed than she had ever dreamed. she attended miami nor land senior high school and according to facebook took classes in criminal justice at miami university, though the school says they have no record. she's from north miami where she says her and trayvon martin had met in elementary school. why do we care so much who this woman is? because her testimony on what trayvon told her the night he died could make or break the case. if what she says is true, trayvon martin was scared and trying to get away from a man, a man that was george zimmerman. she may have credibility issues. he's been caught lying about her age and about her reason for not attending trayvon's funeral. and then there is her vanishing postings on twitter. according to the smoking gun, tweets referring to trayvon and the case were removed just hours before her testimony. like this one from june 21st. 16 months later, wow, i need a drink. jeantel had also tweeted about having quote jackass lawyers on my ass. it's unclear which lawyers she's referring to but certainly has held her own with zimmerman's attorneys in court. she took heat for this audio interview she gave the martin family attorney early on in the investigation. >> what did you hear? >> get off, some stuff. >> you heard get off? >> like look, get off. >> reporter: watch how she puts defense lawyer don west on his heels in court about delays his interview with her. >> when you did not want to interview me that friday. >> i didn't want to interview you? >> well -- >> we didn't -- we didn't have an interview, did we? >> no, but we agreed to that friday. >> i'm sorry that you were inconvenienced but we did not have the interview on friday because of schedulingish shups, do you agree with that? >> you should have picked me up on thursday. >> rachel jeantel was hoping to put this all behind her with this simple handwritten letter to trayvon's mother, a friend helped her write it. she sent it about a month after his death and in it explains what she remembers from that night. the man started getting closer, then trayvon turned around and said why are you following me? then i heard him fall. then the phone hung up. when the defense asked her to read the letter in court she said she couldn't read cursive handwriting and later explained she's of haitian descent and grew up speaking spanish. on her facebook monday, two days before her testimony began she posted i know i have a lot of explaining to do. randi kaye, cnn, atlanta. >> don parks and crump have been handling the legal matters and in mr. park's case. he joins us live. as the martin family attorney, how do you think rachel's testimony went today? >> i think rachel's team was great, anderson. she stood fast. her testimony was consistent, and as you see, she through various attempts to i'm peach her, held her own. >> she seemed less combative in her testimony today than yesterday. did you or your colleagues prepare her for today's testimony or give her advice on what to do differently? >> no, she has her own counsel in this case, however, remember, yesterday she came at the latter part of the court day. so she was tired and most people sitting in court were tired and we went fairly late. so i believe that she was just tired. obviously, once she was given the chance to rest overnight, came back and she was a great witness. she was very respectful to the court and gave very precise answers. >> so, you're saying you nor mr. crump gave her advice about what to do differently today on the stand? >> no, as a matter of fact, i believe she was in the custody of the agents. we had no access to her whatsoever. >> do you feel the defense attorney john west was too hash with her today? >> well, i think mr. west's presentation spoke for itself. you know, i try to make sure i don't criticize lawyers and their styles, but i think -- i don't believe mr. west is really connected with the jury but we'll see from their verdict. >> you gave a press conference after court today where you said the martin family wanted to make it clear that quote race was not a part of to this process but a lot of the prosecution's opening statement is about george zimmerman profiling trayvon martin. >> well, anderson, i think you have to distinguish that when you have a situation where we see that george zimmerman is talking in the 911 tape and describing what he was seeing in va v trayvon martin and calling him suspicious. we don't believe the focus is really race. additionally, the charge he is facing has nothing to do with race. >> so you don't believe that george zimmerman felt trayvon martin was suspicious because he was african american? >> no, i think he saw a person who had a hoodie on, who was walking. he didn't know who he was. it was a raining night. it was dark, so he thought that maybe he was seeing some of the previous conduct that he had seen in his neighborhood, so he decided at that particular point that these people always get away with it and on that night he wouldn't let it happen. >> when he was referring to, you know, these people or blanking punks as he said, you don't think that was in all a reference to african american youth? >> well, i think he saw someone that he thought was highly suspicious, someone he thought was up to something bad, that he wanted to do something about it. i think it's important, though, for purposes of where we are now, we're in a court case, bringing race into this situation does nothing but make people pick sites and invoke some preg judge into the proc d proceederin proceederings. we want mr. zimmerman to have a nice, fair and just trial. >> you're sitting with mr. zimmerman's parents. they get up when testimony is graphic, how are you holding up? >> it's very tough. so they are taking it piece by piece. i think the state is making sure they try and give us advance notice about some sensitive parts, but you had situations for example when trayvon's face was shown in some of the evidence. it was tough for tracy because that's a picture he used to identify trayvon's body and showing that picture in court invoked that. mom has had some issues, you know, just hearing syst ing som 911 tapes and the gunshot that killed your child is very tough. they are doing -- they are maintaining. they are here to see it through. they are very encouraged by what they are see income court and the job the state of florida is doing to present this case. >> appreciate your time. thanks for being on. >> thank you for having me. >>> exclusively on "360" mark o'mara. good to have you on. rachel jeantel, do you think her testimony went well for the defense. do you think it's worked in the defense's favor? >> well, you know, i think that she was a witness, she didn't want to be involved and waited so long and found out by happenstance. i was most concerned not with her testimony but the way she started with mr. crump's interview, off record without law enforcement there and more problematic, the interview, she's sitting right next to trayvon martin's mother when she's supposed to give her first sworn law enforcement statement and in that statement she didn't tell the truth on a number of issues. i think she didn't want to be there. she was reluctant and i think that reluctancy showed up in her testimony today and yesterday. >> and stressing in the court today about trayvon martin's mo mother during that interview, does that say she was either changing her statements to the police based on who -- on the family being present? >> well, she testified that she did. she testified that when she was talking to ben crump and the mom was there and when she was talking to mr. delirion and trayvon's mother next to her on the couch and tearing up and crying, she lighteninged up. you have to wonder why any law enforcement officer with 30 years experience would risk taking a statement from a witness in front of the deceased mother. you have to know that there will be some impact and as she testified today and yesterday. there was impact because she didn't say what she heard on the -- on the telephone. she actually went light. she sort of modified it herself, and we don't know to what extent she modified with curse words and who she wanted to blame talking in front of the mother. >> have you ever heard of police interviewing a witness or potential witness in front of the parent of the victim? >> let me think for a moment. absolutely not. it is cop 101 and prosecutor 101. you have to maintain the individual nature of a witness' testimony, make sure they are absolutely not impacted or bias by the situation that they are in. we know you can't do it, you know, with bright lights and a rubber hose. you also can't do it with sympathy parent taking a statement in front of the decease's mothers. >> you said you may have to ask her additional questions, why? >> there are certain issues that may become relevant and that's talking about trayvon's history and background. my hope from the beginning is that we don't go there and try this case simply on the seven or eight minutes that happened around his passing, however, if the state presents something that needs to be rebutted by looking into trayvon martin's past, then this witness who knows pretty well and actually gave some fairly colorful statements as to what trayvon martin said, as far as some race and fighting may well become relevant. i hope not, but we may have to get that on the record. >> how does your client, george zimmerman, feel about how the trial is going? >> he's afraid. he felt he did something he has to do to protect his life and other people are trying to put him in prison because of it. he's stressed for a year and a half getting to this point and dealing with the reality he has the state of florida trying to say that what he did to save his own life is a crime, and that's a fightening position to be in. >> mark o'mara, good to have you on the program again. thank you. >> good to be here, thank you. >>> we'll devote the 10:00 p.m. eastern hour to today's developments. key testimony, evidence, and our legal panel. we'll get more legal ann lists in and show you the key moments from this trial today in case you missed any of it. self-defense or murder, the george zimmerman trial. >>> for more on the zimmerman trial, go to cnn.com any time. >>> just ahead, stunning new development in the story that rocked the nfl. hernandez investigated to his possible connection to a dobl homicide last year. >>> and does paula deen's racial slur deserve all the backlash. two very different opinions on that. she's reached out to jessie jackson and he joins me to tell us what he discussed with paula deen coming up. to accept less and less in the name of style and sophistication. but to us, less isn't more. more is more. abundant space, available leading-edge technology, impeccable design, and more than you've come to expect from a luxury vehicle. the lexus es350 and epa-estimated 40 mpg es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. the day building a play set begins with a surprise twinge of back pain... and a choice. take up to 4 advil in a day or 2 aleve for all day relief. 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[ laughter ] [ male announcer ] connect all your wi-fi-enabled devices with u-verse high speed internet. rethink possible. >>> welcome back. new development the tonight in "crime and punishment." aaron hernandez charged in the murder of a 27-year-old acquaintance is being investigated for a double homicide in boston last july. as we've reported, just hours after his arrest yesterday, hernandez was dropped by his team the new england patriots. today puma ended it relationship with him and he was denied bail again when he appealed the ruling. the prosecutors say they have uncovered new evidence. >> reporter: authorities are now investigating whether aaron hernandez might have been involved in an unsolved double-murder in boston last summer. a law enforcement source telling cnn boston police found a silver suv linked to the case after looking for it since last year and believe hernandez was renting it at the time of the murders. >> we're following every lead and believe we're making progress. at this moment in time it's too premature to name any one individual. >> reporter: hernandez' lawyers won't comment. they wanted to spring hernandez from jail on the first-degree murder charge on the execution style death of oiden lloyd. >> december spect the fact he has a fiancee and has a baby and a homeowner, he has the means to flee and a bracelet wouldn't keep him here over $250,000. >> reporter: prosecutors revealing new alleged evidence and a condo leased by hernandez in a town near the football player's home and in a hummer outside said to be linked to hernandez, they seized .45 caliber ammunition and clip, the same type of ammunition allegedly used to kill lloyd. in court, prosecutors called attention to a photo obtained by tmz calling hernandez holding a .45 caliber semi automatic handgun. >> the evidence of this photograph, holding a .45. >> reporter: they said hernandez was angry about something that was said in this nightclub. >> he was upset about and didn't trust the victim. >> reporter: they said they built their case against hernandez using cell phone tower tracking, text messages and surveillance tapes at hernandez' home and elsewhere. in the wee hours of june 17th, hernandez allegedly picked up lloyd at his home. they were then joined by two other unidentified passengers. they stopped at a gas station and bought blue bubble gum. during that ride at 3:22 a.m., lloyd sends a text to his sister reminding her of who he was with. he writes nfl just so you know. two minutes later, witnesses hear shots near the murder scene. about four minutes later, hernandez is seen carrying a gun arriving home with two other people. investigators say they matched shell casings from the murder scene to one .45 shell from hernandez' car. >> defendant and his two confed reds appear at the rental agency where they rented the silver nissan altima. at that time they go in to return the car, the defendant offers the attendant a piece of blue bubble gum and finds a .45 casing as well as a piece of what appeared to be chewed bubble gum. >> so, i mean, this is fascinating. are authorities saying whether or not they think hernandez pulled the trigger in the murder? they said he has two confederates. >> reporter: they are saying it this way, that he ork strachest the execution and he and another man delivered the fatal blows to lloyd while laying on the ground. either way, hernandez is charged with first-degree murder. >> susan, thanks very much. >>> more companies are dumping paula deen after she admitted to using a racial slur years ago. the backlash is fast and fur yos, but is it fair? i'll speak to the reverend jessie jackson. >>> and what the boston bomber is charged with and what he faces if convicted, coming up. know savings. this metal frame pool on rollback, you save $80! and this 4 burner grill on rollback, you save $11. get more summer for your money at walmart's super summer savings event. plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. i'm going to dream about that steak. i'm going to dream about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? oh, yeah. 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[ male announcer ] but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, osit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. the ones getting involved and staying engaged. they're not afraid to question the path they're on. because the one question they never want to ask is "how did i end up here?" i started schwab for those people. people who want to take ownership of their investments, like they do in every other aspect of their lives. >>> for companies are dropping paula deen after she admitted to using a racial slur in the past. home depot and target said they won't sell her products and a diabetes drug maker suspended her contract, as well. this is a day after her tearful experience on the today show. >> if there is anyone out there that has never said something that they wish they could take back, if you're out there, please pick up that stone and throw it so hard at my head that it kills me, please. i want to meet you. i want to meet you. i is what i is, and i'm not changing. >> the food network, walmart and sears have also dumped deen but one thing that isn't taking a hit is her book sales. preorders for the october release of paula deen's new testament, 250 recipes are so strong it's on the top of amazon's best seller's list. deen herself hired a crisis management firm. the question is in paula deen's case, does the punishment fit the crime? i spoke with reverend jesse jackson and boys watkins. >> i spoke to paula deen. i understand she reached out to you. what did she explain and talk to you about? >> she explained she's not a racist. she appeared to be agonizing over the acquisitions but the issues now and it's not just the words but she must spend her time now off of the circuit focused on the workplace conditions a, and the plan to have workplace conditions than past the test of friends. if she does that, she can be reclaimed and redeemed. >> professor watkins, we spoke the other day about her. you said in the past you've been a fan of hers. i'm wondering if your opinion changed at all, if just over the last couple days. what do you make of where she is now and what is happening? >> in order to really try to connect with paula and the situation, i reached to my elders. i spoke with reverend jackson and my grandmother. i'm fortunate enough to have a grandmother still alive and those prospectives allowed me to do something i can't do at my age, to really look at the world through the eyes of somebody who dealt with the paula deen's of the world in the 1950s, '60s and '70s and the best lesson paula deen can get from this is there a difference between liking you and respecting you. i think she has a lot of friends that are african american, and i think in her mind she really loves these people, but the question is whether or not she truly respects african americans as her equals. remember, people love their pet but don't want their dog at the dinner table. the issue to me is that paula can be completely redeemed and forgiven, but forgiveness goes deeper than what you say. it comes down to what you do. >> reverend jackson, i got a lot of tweets from people that support paula deen and advanced sales of her cookbook are number one and a lot of people are tweeting me saying the media is making too much of this. this seems like a good person. maybe she used completely inappropriate language in the past, but this has much to do about nothing. what do you say to that? what do those people not understand? >> there is something to do about something. grace can be a sin. it's not just the words so many years ago but the workplace environment. she should immediately address the charges against her. she should immediately address and thoroughly invest her work environment. is it fair? is it open? is it non-racial? is it sensitive? and they plan to make it the best workplace it can be. so the contrite words amongst and she is reclaimable if she takes immediate actions and stops trying to justify herself. >> professor watkins, is this an opportunity for people to get out of the comfort zone and have a discussion about race that maybe they haven't had or don't want to have? >> this is another opportunity. the reality is this, anderson, when someone comes to you and they say, what you said offended me, that this concept, this idea that you shared, it hurts my feelings, you have a choice. you can say oh, you're crazy or your feelings are not valid, what is wrong with you? or you can show respect and say, i don't quite understand why you feel this way, but why don't you explain it to me? why don't you help me understand, and i'll help you understand how i feel. that's how you have a productive dialogue and i think one of the things we're running into is you have millions of people in america that never endured race in the workplace and the horrors and atrocities people of color in this country experienced for hundreds of years and get to the point where they devalue that because they think that someone wrote a great cookbook. the reality is if we want to make progress and paula wants to redeem herself, this is a chance to have a good dialogue -- >> some people say she's from a sernt generation -- >> anderson -- >> go ahead. >> i would urge her to look at the crisis quickly, take on the ship, move with a plan to make it a workshop. i don't think we're spending a lot of time arguing on the 20-year goal but the workplace security is very important for workers everywhere. >> professor watkins, people saying she's from a certain generation, from a certain region, she grew up a certain way and she's a product of her past? >> well, i think she is. paula deen was made in america just like malcolm x was made in america. he went through so much oppression and so many horrific experiences in his life that he spent his whole life fighting against the racism that destroyed his family. with paula deen we have to realize that paula deen is a symptom, symbol, manifestation of millions of other americans around the country who think in the same way. they don't understand why these words can be hurtful. they don't understand that this is a product of an environment, this is a product of structural racism so wiping paula deen off the planet will not make america a better country. i don't want to see her career destroyed. i want to see her cooking her food, which i've eaten and is good. we have to use this as a chance to do deep cleaning on racial inu quality and not just cleanse the surface because if we don't, we'll have the same problem 50 years from now. >> reverend jackson, professor watkins, appreciate it. >>> just ahead tonight, the sweeping indictment against the boston bombing suspect the, more than a dozen out counts carry a possible death sentence. >>> president obama made extensive remarks about edward snowden and how the u.s. will go to find him, like will they force a plane down with snowden on it. stay tuned for his answer. 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[ woman ] hop on over! this is what matters. the experience of a product. how will it make someone feel? will it make life better? does it deserve to exist? we spend a lot of time on a few great things. until every idea we touch enhances each life it touches. you may rarely look at it. but you'll always feel it. this is our signature. and it means everything. >>> check out other stories we're following. susan hendrix has the 360 bulletin. >> reporter: the former visit president retired marine general has been notified he's under investigation for allegedly leaking information about a highly classified u.s. cyber attack on iran's new clear program. cnn has not confirmed it and he and his lawyer have not commented nor have the u.s. justice department. >>> president obama made the most expensive remark so far at snowden. the expressed concern about secrets snowden might spell and president obama said he won't take extra orpd narcotordinary capture him. >> i won't scramble jets to get a 29-year-old hacker. >> a massachusetts grand jury returned a 30-count indictment against boston bombing suspect dzhokhar tsarnaev. 17 of those charges carry the possibility of the death penalty. >>> in new york, family friends, co-stars and friends said good-bye to james gandolfini. he died of a heart attack in rome last week. he was acclaimed for his role as tony soprano. >> thanks. we'll be right back. 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"piers morgan live" starts now. "piers morgan live" starts now. see you in an hour. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> this is "piers morgan live." welcome, tonight drama in the courtroom. trayvon martin's friend takes the stand for the second day. the teenage girl who has a unique way of making sir sound like an insult. >> he did not tell me that, sir, he just told me he trying to get home, sir, but the man was still following -- following him, sir. >> and the last moment of trayvon martin's life captured on a chilling 911 call. >> [ inaudible ] >> do you think he's yelling
MSNBC
Jul 1, 2013 11:00am PDT
a possible testimony this week of trayvon martin's parents, tracy martin and sabrina fulton. they're expected to tell the jury the screams on that particular 911 tape belong to their son. the jury will also hear from another key witness, lead investigator in the martin shooting, who originally recommended that zimmerman be charged with manslaughter. i want to take you back right now to mark o'mara, who's questioning the detective on the scene, also who questioned. let's listen in. >> you had mentioned -- i'm going to skip around just a little bit and hit subjects rather than the timeline. the entirety of your true interaction with mr. zimmerman was on the tape, correct? it was small bits that were not -- >> a little bit before i could get it started. introductions to each other when i walked in the room, i'm sure. and something that might have been said as i walked out. >> sure. the substance of it we've all heard now from the tape itself. >> yes. >> and as to that interview, you don't have a great deal of testimony that you can offer the jury except to listen to the tape, c
MSNBC
Jul 5, 2013 12:00pm PDT
, trayvon martin's mother took the stand in a gripping testimony. sybrina fulton testified about one of the most critical questions in this case, saying that she was certain it was her son's voice screaming on that critical 911 call. the jury also heard testimony from trayvon martin's older brother and from the medical examiner who performed the autopsy on trayvon martin and who said trayvon experienced pain and suffering after the fatal gunshot. but the day began with that heart wrenching testimony that sybrina fulton that revealed her pain and her pride. >> do you have any children? >> yes, i do. >> and can you tell us who they are and their names? >> my youngest son is trayvon benjamin martin. he's in heaven. >> he's in heaven. just moments was a that emotional testimony, the jury alsolistened to a painful 911 tape that captured the final seconds of her son's life. >> prior to your son's death, had you heard him crying or yelling prior to his death? had you ever heard him while he was growing up and while you were raising him, had you ever heard him crying or yelling? >> yes. >> i wa
CNN
Jun 28, 2013 10:00am PDT
zimmerman shot and killed trayvon martin. george is howell outside the court in sanford florida. jane velez-mitchell is joining us from new york. george, zimmerman's neighbor, george good, he's a state witness but he corroborates zimmerman's story he was being pummelled in that fight. tell us about the testimony that occurred today. we don't have george. maybe jane can brief us. are you there? >> i am. jonathan good is good for george zimmerman because he corroborates his story. he says he heard a tussle, goes outside and the person he describes as being on the bottom fits the description in terms of the clothing he was wearing of george zimmerman. he also said he saw a ground and pound meaning the person on the top was grounding and pounding which he modified saying he didn't see anything with 100% certainty. i have to say his testimony was contradicted the night before just last night. another neighbor said she saw man who fit the description of george zimmerman on top. you have all these other witnesses, residents on a dark and murky night seeing fragments. >> mow unusual is
MSNBC
Jun 29, 2013 2:00am PDT
happened in the last moments before the shooting death of trayvon martin? in court today, one of george zimmerman's neighbors, john good said he heard what sounded like a fight that night and stepped outside his town house to see what was going on. what he saw, according to the neighbor, was what appeared to be zimmerman lying on his back with trayvon martin straddling and punching him. he used a mixed martial art term, ground and pound, to describe what martin was doing. good also testified there was a call for help, likely from the man at the bottom who he believed was zimmerman that was different from the testimony we heard from another neighbor yesterday who thought it was zimmerman who was on top. joining us now, arise legal contributor seema, joseph haynes davis, former federal prosecutor kendall coffey, and dana swickle. let's get into this question of who was on top. seema, yesterday we had testimony from a neighbor who they played back her very tearful 911 call. and she testified she thought the bigger man, the larger man, meaning george zimmerman was on top. today you h
FOX News
Jun 28, 2013 10:00am PDT
bombshell testimony approximate the night george zimmerman shot trayvon martin. so we'll get you up to speed on the trial that attracted more and more attention each and every day. we had opening statements and the prosecution argued that zimmerman profiled and murdered trayvon martin. and zimmerman's lawyer claims it was all self defense and slammed later for a courtroom attempt at a homer. and day two, lawyers argued over the admissibility of the police calls he made months before the shooting and they were admitted. and a police official wo worked with zimmerman also testified on day two, and we came to day three. the woman who called 911 and the star witness, the woman on the phone with trayvon martin immediately before the confrontation between the teen and zimmerman. her testimony was compelling if not consistent. and martin when she spoke to him on the phone appeared to be scared and talked about being followed. day four, that same friend returned to the witness stand and challenged by the defense about the inconsistencies and she was rather formal and different rachel that we s
CNN
Jul 1, 2013 9:00am PDT
>> yes. >> you ended up here and is this when he circles your car? >> yes. >> he comes up from where? >> i don't know. >> you just notice he's circling your car? >> yes. >> you're still on the phone? >> yes. >> are you giving them a description? >> yes. >> where does he go when you liez lose sight of him? >> he walks back into the darkness. >> does he make the turn? you can be the see him? >> correct. >> you're still in your car? >> yes. >> then what happens? >> the dispatcher asks me what direction he went and what direction i was at. >> you don't realize what street you're on. you're trying to figure out what street you're on. you see him go here. what do you do? >> i got out of my vehicle to look at this house's address and see if it was a sign there. there wasn't. i walked through the dog walk to see if there was a sign here on an address a this i could make out easier. >> then what happens? >> the dispatcher asks me if i'm out of my car. they said do you know what direction he went in. i said no. they said are you following him? >> i said i don't know where he went. >> you continue straight on the sidewalk? >> yes. all the way through. >> what happens. you decide you still don't know where you're at? >> i still didn't know where i was at but i was able to give the dispatcher a description from the clubhouse. i said they come straight in past the clubhouse and my car is right here. >> okay. is your car running or you shut it off. >> off. >> you just park here. you follow him. you walk here. when you get here you realize i'm just going to go back to my car, is that whats? >> no. the dispatcher says would you like a police officer to still come out. i said i don't know where he went. he asked me for what direction they went in or what road. i said i don't know where he went. they said do you still want an officer to meet you. i said yes. they said where do you want them to meet you. i said at my car. i start walking back towards my car. >> is this all dark in here? >> yes. >> there's no lighting back here unless it comes from someone's houses? >> yes. >> is it all dark down here so you can't see anything down here? >> yes. >> at what point and where from what bushes does he jump out? >> it was somewhere around here. >> did you know, is there bushes along this walkway. where are the bushes? >> the hedges are on the sides and the back of the buildings. >> you think it's somewhere up near the t where he jumps out? >> yes. >> did he jump out in front or did he come up behind you? >> i don't recall. >> he was from what you guess he's somewhere hiding at this t in the bushes when he jumps out? >> okay. >> then where do you end up when you're on the ground? >> he punched me in the face. i fell backwards. i don't even know where he ended up. >> when the police took you they took you -- >> back out this way. >> okay. when that man was standing there with the flashlight, do you remember what building he was from? >> no. >> do you remember what building you saw when you said you saw somebody? >> this one. >> you saw somebody over here when the guy says i'm calling? >> yes. >> this is the building where you see somebody? okay. he jumps out of bushes somewhere in this area? >> yes, ma'am. >> okay. what kind of gun. >> .9mm. >> i'll get you another one. you can have soda or coffee. >> water. >> do you need to use the restroom yet? >> no ma'am. >> may i approach the witness? >> yes, you may. >> i'm going to show you what's been introduced into evidence 176. do you recognize state's exhibit 176, ma'am? >> yes. this is the google map that he wrote on. >> is that the google map that you were using in the last interview with the defendant? >> yes, this the same map. >> okay. may the court assist us by dimming the lights a bit. i apologize. ma'am, i'm showing you state's exhibit 176. do you see it there? >> yes. >> is this the google map you used and had the defendant describe his actions and what and where he came into contact with the person we now know as trayvon martin? >> yes, that's the same map. >> let's go over a few things. i'm pointing to what appears to be a pink right here. what's the significance of that? does it say car on there? >> it says car. that's where he says his car was when he first noticed trayvon. >> all right. here is what i'm going to do. i'm going to blow up part of this map so jurors can see it. okay. right here i'm pointing to where it says the word car. he's actually writing that in or you writing that in. how does that progress? >> he wrote that down. i may have put the direction of the arrow showing the direction he was going. >> the defendant was driving. okay. what appears here is something in pink. what is that? >> that's to indicate where he first saw trayvon. >> he comes into contact and sees trayvon martin, the victim where the x is? >> yes. >> in terms of using this map, ipi see what appears to be the line. what's the significance of that? >> it shows the route of car and the line that leaves the x shows the route of where he says trayvon passed him and went behind the first set of houses there. >> okay. >> the houses to the right of the clubhouse, you see three. they're at the top of the t. >> right here. further down here? let's go back to right here. is that what you understood to be the clubhouse area that i'm circling right here? >> yes. >> there appears to be here an x and some lines right here. do you see that? >> yes, i believe it should say 911. that's where his car went when he said he called 911 there. >> may i approach the witness again? >> yes. >> i'm going to give you the actual exhibit. we have that up there. that's 911? tell us again the significance of this right here that i'm circling. this part of the exhibit. >> you'll see from the first place he says the car is there's a line that shows him going there. then instead of putting car at that location because he said he remained in his car, we used 911 to show that's where he was in his car when he called 911. >> now on this exhibit are there two lines one going there way and the other one going the same way but two lines going parallel at that point? >> yes. the x indicates trayvon martin, the first x all the way to the left. >> all the way over here? >> it's supposed to be a line showing the x stops at the car at some point where he says he looked into the car. >> he being trayvon martin looked into the defendant's car? >> that's what george zimmerman is explaining happens. >> okay. go ahead. >> then when i asked him draw a line where you say after trayvon leaves you where he ends up when he's out of your sight. that's the arrow that goes straight and ends up behind the houses right there. if you go up a bit it's right behind the house where he loses sight of him. he follows the street around. >> that's where the defendant claims that he lost sight of trayvon martin? >> yes. >> okay. now, you also have something here and i can't make out what that is, but it's pink and it's some kind of writing there. tell me the san francisco ignif that. >> it leaves the clubhouse. i asked him to draw where he goes from there. he initially wrote that he stopped there but scribbled that out to change where the car ends up a little more forward. >> right here? >> if that's where it says car. >> okay. he originally had it here and it moves here. a what happens over here? >> that where he says trayvon circled his car. >> where that circle is and the x that's where the defendant claims trayvon martin came up and circled his car, is that correct? >> yes. >> tell us what in terms of the defendant is telling you using this google map what he claims occurred after that? >> trayvon leaves that area and goes straight into the t. >> am i pointing it out this way? >> yes. >> he says at the top of the t he doesn't know if trayvon continues straight or if he went down. >> okay. let me, i'm going to point this cursor. the defendant claiming he didn't know if trayvon martin went this way or went down this way? >> that was my understanding. >> what else does the defendant claim? >> he got out of the car to locate a house address so that he could better tell dispatch where he was. this is all on the tape so you can hear exactly what he said. >> the defendant is claiming he got out of vehicle here to try to get an address to tell dispatch where he was at? >> yes. >> what happens? the reason i'm asking is it appears to be lines going this way. if you could tell us the significance of that? >> he says he goes all the way across the t to the other side. >> okay. stop me if i'm going too far. does he claim he's going like this? >> yes. >> all way to this street? >> yes. >> what is the defendant claim occurs when he gets over to the street that circles the whole retreat at twin lakes? >> i believe that's where he says he lost him. he's telling dispatch he doesn't know where he is. he says when he was there is when he no longer knew which direction trayvon had gone and thought maybe he was hiding. >> meaning he didn't know whether trayvon martin went this or whether he went this way right here, one of those two? >> yes. >> what does this defendant then claim at this point? >> he discusses with dispatch whether or not the police should still come to the scene and it's agreed they will. >> okay. what else does the defendant claim to what occurred? >> he begins to walk past back to the vehicle which would mean he has to go past the intersection to go back to where he parked. >> am i going the right way? >> yes. he says it happened at the intersection of the t. >> right here. what does this defendant claims happen there? >> that trayvon approaches him. he's not sure exactly where he came from. >> okay. in the interview that you conducted of mr. zimmerman, the defendant, he said something came out of bushes or something. were you trying to use in this google map determine or have him point out where it was he claims the victim came out of? >> right. in some of the areas you can see bushes but i couldn't see them in that area. i was trying to figure out what he was attempting to say. >> okay. what happens then? >> he says that's when trayvon approaches him and said what he said on the tape. >> all right. you have appears xs drawn right here. >> that's the location he said when he was calling for help and saw somebody at a residence he indicated that was the area that he had seen the person from a resident that's located in that area. >> okay. ma'am, you've conducted an interview and you conducted a second interview using the google map. do you take additional steps regarding your interview with the defendant? specifically, do you give him paper for him to write out a written statement? >> yes. i had him fill in a statement form. i just explained to him as best he could to explain everything he told me in the interview and be very detailed as to what he told me and try to put that in writing. >> now, in terms of the written statement, did you sit with him and go okay. this is not right, change this or how did that occur? di did you leave him alone or say you have to write this or this? how did that proceed? >> no. when i gave him the paper work to write the statement i left the room. when i came back he was done. i had him sign them. i didn't read them. i turned them over to investigators. >> when you say you actually gave him paper -- may i approach the witness? >> yes. >> i'm going to show state's exhibit 175. i believe there's no objection. >> yes, thank you. >> let me show you state's exhibit 175. do you recognize state's exhibit 175? >> i do. this is the statement that george zimmerman wrote that night. >> i believe is that four actual pages? >> i believe it was four, but i'll check. yes, it's four. >> when you say four actual page, what do you mean by that in terms of, you witnessed? every page you kind of write -- >> i don't mean i witnessed him filling it out. i witnessed he signed and that's his signature on each page. they swear to it. they affirm everything they wrote in the statement is true and they say yes and that's what i'm witnessing. >> he signed each page? >> yes. i did as well. >> you did as a witness too? >> yes. >> all right. may i approach? >> yes. >> i'm going to leave you exhibit 175. i gather the pages are numbered in some way, some fashion at the bottom? >> yes. down at the bottom it says one of four and the second should say two of four, three of four, four of four. >> what i'm going to do is blow this up so the jury can see this and get the first part first. are you getting -- what is up there at the very top? >> that's already preset print and he fills out the information it's asking for. >> that would indicate what, his name? >> name, address, date of birth, social security number, phone number, city, dod number, driver's license number. >> how can i clear it? ma'am, i'm going to go into the written part of the exhibit. first part here. this is his handwriting, the defendant's handwriting, is that correct? >> yes. >> if you can read what he wrote? >> in august of 2011, i can't read with the lights down. >> can you read it from over there. it's an eyesight test. >> it's not gone although i do wear contacts. they're not very helpful sometimes. >> i think jurors can see that. >> in august of 2011 my -- i don't know what i said there. maybe neighbor's house was broken into while she was home with her infant son. the intruders attempted to -- >> attack. >> i think so, attack her and did however spd reported to the scene of it, of the crime and the robbers fled. my wife saw the intruders running from the home and became scared of the rising crime within our neighborhood. i and any neighbors formed a neighborhood watch program. we were instructed by spd to call the nonemergency line if we saw something suspicious and 911 if we saw a crime in progress. >> let me interrupt you a second. how do i go back and get the second part? go ahead. i'm sorry. >> tonight i was on my way to the grocery store when i saw a male approximately 5'11" to 6'2" casually walking in the rain looking into homes. i pulled my vehicle over and called spd nonemergency number. i told the dispatcher what i witnessed and the dispatch took note of my location an the suspect. i think it's said possibly fled. >> now the word suspect, that's his word? were you telling him to put certain words to describe the person we know as trayvon martin? >> i didn't tell him any words to use. i told him to tell me to put in writing what he had explained to me and to be as detailed as he could. >> let me stop you a second. place for him to sign and a place for you to sign as a witness. is that correct ? >> yes. >> i think we're going to go to page 2 but give me a second to catch up to you. page 2, the top part reads the same. it's got his name and i'm going to highlight the first part. go ahead and read. >> in darkened area of the sidewalk as the dispatcher was asking me for exact location the suspect emerged from darkness and circled my vehicle. i could not hear if he said anything. the suspect once again disappeared behind -- >> could that be between? >> possibly. between some of the houses. the dispatcher once again asked me for my exact location. i could not remember the name of i got out of my car to look for the street sign. the dispatcher asked for a description and the direction the suspect went. >> let me interrupt you. sorry. okay. go ahead. i apologize. >> i told the dispatcher i did not know. i was out of my vehicle looking in -- i'm sorry, looking for a street sign and direction the suspect went. the dispatcher told me not to follow the suspect. and that an officer was in route and i headed back to my vehicle. when i headed back to my vehicle -- i'm sorry. it's as i headed back to my vehicle the suspect emerged from the darkness and said you got a problem? i said no. the suspect said you do now. i can't figure out what that last word is. you do now and looked maybe. it maybe says and looked. >> we're going to move onto page 3. let me stop you before you read that and we're going to highlight the first part. he uses the word suspect to refer to trayvon martin. have you uttered those words or informed him of any way that's the word he's supposed to use to refer to trayvon martin? >> no. >> thank you. go ahead. page 3. >> finished off and looked and tried to -- i guess he's trying to say i looked to dial my phone. the suspect pushed me. the suspect punched me in the face. i fell back. >> backwards. >> i fell backwards onto my back. the suspect got on top of me. i yelled help several times. the suspect told me -- the suspect grabbed my head and slammed into into the concrete several times. i continued to yell help. each time i attempted to sit up the suspect slams my head into the sidewalk. >> hold on. i'm sorry. i'm trying to catch up here. sorry. go ahead. >> my head felt like it was going to plode. i tried to slide out from under the suspect and continue to yell help. as i slid, the suspect covered my mouth and nose and stopped my breathing. at this point i felt the suspect reach for my now my firearm. >> could that be unholstered? >> yes, that makes sense. in fear of my life. i unholstered my firearm in fear for my life as he had assumed -- >> could that be assured. >> you think it says what? >> i believe it's assured. >> as he -- i don't know if it's assured or assumed, he was going to kill. >> before you get to page 4, we got to pull it up. >> now i've seen the whole sentence maybe i can figure it out. my life as he assured he was going to kill me. >> okay. >> fired one shot into his torso. the suspect sat back allowing me to sit up and said you got me. at this point i slid out from underneath him and got on top of the suspect holding his hands away from his body. >> an onlooker. >> an onlooker appeared and asked me if i was okay. i said no. he said i was calling 911. i said i don't need you to call 911. i already called them. i need you to help me restrain this guy. at this point spd officer arrived and asked who shot him. i said i did and i placed my hands on top of my head and told the officer where on my person my firearm was holstered. the officer handcuffed me and disarmed me. the officer then placed me in the back of his vehicle. >> you signed that last page also like you had the prior four pages. >> yes. >> okay. >> now the defendant refers to trayvon martin as a suspect, correct? >> he did in the statement. >> in that written statement. in the prior statements he did not, the prior audio statements he didn't refer to him as a suspect? >> no, he did not refer to him as a suspect in anything but this. >> all right. >> when police officers are talking about a person they suspect of doing committing a crime do they refer to them as suspect? >> yes, we do if we suspect them of a crime. they're a suspect. >> okay. now i don't know if it would be a good time to take a recess. >> we'll recess for lunch. i'm going to remind you that during the lunchtime you're not to have any discussions amongst yourself or anybody about the case. you're not to read or listen to any television, radio rors about the case. not to use any type of electronic device about the case, people, places things or terminology. you're not to read, create any e ma mails, text messages or blogs. we'll be back at 1:30. please fold your note pads down and follow. >> judge debra nelson warns this jury daily and often do not tweet, read, discussion or talk. this is a sequestered jury. highly publicized case. a lot of information out there. some of it wrong, some of it right, some of it so off base. that's what she's trying to protect this jury from. don't consume the wrong thing. listen to the people you're listening to on the stand. a remarkable witness has just taken the stand. detective doris singleton not only did an audio tape but also took the written statement. we not only heard the words of george zimmerman, we saw and read the george zimmerman. this is a quick break that the judge is now going to take this recess. we'll see the great seal. there it is which signifies no more camera. we'll take a quick break and be back with what this all means and why it's so critical to the case, coming up. dad. how did you get here? i don't know. [ speaking in russian ] look, look, look... you probably want to get away as much as we do. with priceline express deals, you can get a fabulous hotel without bidding. think of the rubles you'll save. with one touch, fun in the sun. i like fun. well, that went exactly as i planned.. really? now save up to 60% during summer hotel sale. use code "summer" on priceline's. >>> welcome back the our continuing live coverage of george zimmerman on trial for second-degree murder. i'm ashleigh banfield live in san ford, florida. you're not missing any testimony. they're in a brief break inside that courtroom. man, was that significant what he heard today. the great seal is the shot you're seeing now but we're going to give you more testimony and we're going to get you right back into the live action the minute it sparks back up. in the meantime i want to break down why this latest witness is so critical. detective doris singleton has been on the stand for a better part of an hour. mark nejame is live with me here. while we've been listening to this, there's been so many bits and pieces that have escaped the general consumption of this case and they are the details that are the devil or maybe not. specifically, what george zimmerman said he did after he shot trayvon martin. explain the wording and why it's critical. >> i think you framed it perfectly. i think what so many have missed and what's so profound to me is we will hear the defense come forward and say those witnesses, those first several witnesses who all said that they saw george zimmerman on top trayvon martin, they're going to end upbringing to the jurors that yes, he was on top of him at a certain time but only after he have shot. then he laid him out an he was atop him which becomes consistent with all these first witnesses who came out running and looked through their window and say they saw george zimmerman atop trayvon martin. that seemed to escape everybody because there was a moment in time when george zimmerman according to what we're hearing from zimmerman was atop him. when you start putting the pieces together that becomes consistent with the defense theory that trayvon martin was ato top and the shooting took place and after that there was a rollover. this all happens within a few seconds. people get little looksies and that start piecing the case together. >> i want to bring in a couple other guests as well. we've been able to isolate that moment of testimony that's so critical. i want to replay it for you. i want to listen carefully to what this detective and george zimmerman are discussing and the description of this moment in the fight. have a listen. >> he banged my head again i just pulled out my firearm arm and shot him. >> okay. >> then what happened? you're both on the ground? >> i'm on my back. he's mounted on top of me. i just shot him and he falls off and he's like you got it. you got it. >> does he fall to the side and he stays laying on the ground? >> i don't remember. my vision was blurry. >> you didn't feel him fall towards you. he ended up to one side or the other? >> i don't remember. i think when i shot him it might have pushed him back. i didn't know what -- it felt like he was hitting me with bricks. once i shot him i holstered my firearm and got on top of him and held his hands out because he was still talking. i said stay down. don't move. then somebody comes out and i couldn't see. it was a flashlight. i asked if it was a police officer. he said no. it was a witness but he have calling the police. i said the police are on their way. he should be here already. i had called. he's like i'm calling the police. i'm like i don't need you to call the police, i need you to help me with this guy. >> i don't need you to call the police. need you to help me with this guy is the testimony you just heard from the audio tape. i want to bring in george howell who is live with me here at the courthouse. i'm not sure if this was surprising to you. i know there's been so much in discovery in this case but when you hear it from his own mouth within an hour or two of the actual killing it does sound very profound. >> reporter: the thing that we're looking for as reporters, is inconsistencies from looking at the different elements of discovery. when you look at the video, the video reenactment and compare that to the statement, the few inconsistency are the comments that trayvon martin made to him. you see them on the written statement. you don't hear them on that video and you don't hear them in that audio reenactment. that's what we're finding now. keep this in mind, officer singleton made the point that george zimmerman was read his miranda rights. he agreed to give his story without an attorney and he knew he was being recorded. >> not only that he was very detailed in his audio recording with the detective and then it matched almost moment for moment detail for detail his written statement which was also read out in open court. i want to bring in joey jackson. our legal analysts will help us. joey jackson anything you heard this morning that stood out to you as a moment that will stand out to the jurors? >> many. let me just say this. what we heard here is this. many have been asking will he testify. will george zimmerman take the stand. he just did in essence because his testimony was played and it was played relative to the time it occurred. this is why i think this is critical here. he was able to lay out in the prosecution's case number one, his basis for following him. what did he say? the prosecution has to establish some ill-will, some spite, some wicked mine. what he's talking about is about the break ins and the fact it was raining and he was walking casually about. that didn't seem to right to him. not only that but the demeanor will be relevant. do you detect his demeanor being of a person that was agitated. this is critical testimony. i think that what will happen is the defense will attempt to use it to their advantage. there with more nuggets here but the final thing i'll say, this was done without the benefit of him being cross examined. the prosecution has to point out any and all statements he's fabricating and as a result of that he's guilty and can't be trusted. that's what the prosecution must do. i thought this was very much a defense witness here. >> i keep thinking i'm in a defense case. i'm in week 2 of this trial. it's very difficult to cross examine a tape or cross examine a written statement. danny, i'm going to get you in a moment to weigh in. there's other critical testimony that came out. that's about the screams heard on the p 911 tape. who's screams were they? who can best determine whose screams they are? you'll find out what the expert has to say and why the expert thinks maybe his analysis isn't needed after all. it's coming up in a moment in our special coverage of the george zimmerman trial. >> does he look hurt? >> i can't see him. >> they're sending him. >> you think he's yelling help? >> yes. hi, buddy! that's why the free wifi and hot breakfast are something to smile about. book a great getaway now and feel the hamptonality see, i knew testosterone could affect sex drive, but not energy or even my mood. that's when i talked with my doctor. he gave me some blood tests... showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number. 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[ marge ] fiber the fun way, from phillips'. >>> live coverage of george zimmerman on trial. i'm ashleigh banfield. at the seminole county justice center where they are at a break. we're monitoring it for you. all we have now is the great seal which means dead mikes in the courtroom. a great opportunity to highlight why this morning has been so critical inside this florida courtroom and why it makes a difference to prosecutors and to the defense. strangely enough we're in the prosecution's case but the defense is getting lots of points scored not even when the cross examined. there was a voice analyst who works for the fbi who is asked to determine who was it screaming in the background of those 911 calls. they sounded to the average reasonable person like someone screaming for his life but there were two men and who could determine who best screams they were, an analyst or maybe a family member? i want you to listen to what the analyst said that. he was speaking with the prosecutor about what they had to work with, how little they had work with and why maybe a familiar person might be able to determine who was screaming. have a listen. >> do i get what you're saying is it would be better the you were attempting a familiar voice identification to have someone who has heard potential subject here under a variety of conditions as opposed to talking to them back and forth in a courtroom or a meeting or something like that? >> yes, sir, that's correct. >> that would be the best approach you could take given this particular sound? >> yes. when we hear on the someone's phone say a young man's voice coming through and i may think this guy is young, 20 years old, probably. it can turn out to be a 55-year-old talking or maybe you may think this man is very old, maybe 30, 35 but he can turn out to be only 18 or 19. this al depends upon the individual too. guessing age is a little complicated. >> danny, i want you to come in and tell me why this is so significant given the fact that there are almost no exemplars of trayvon martin's voice to compare. we have plenty of voice of george zimmerman. we have almost nothing. i think three and a half seconds of trayvon martin to compare. >> this is some fascinating science. the end conclusion is the science can't help us. why? because of the quality of the recording and men and women and children have different registers. once we get into screaming everyone sounds similar. it's hard to tell apart. this sets us up for having a parade of witnesses on both side s, trayvon martin's family and george zimmerman saying i'm familiar with that person's scream. not because i'm an expert but because i know this person. that sounds like either trayvon martin's scream or george zimmerman's scream and then it becomes a credibility determination instead of a science. given the prosecution's difficulty so far that may be the best they can hope for is a straight up credibility determination. do you believe trayvon's parents or george zimmerman's witnesses. >> joey jackson, if the foundation of that analyst was to lay some ground work for trayvon martin's mother to take the stand and say that's my baby screaming for his life. then why wouldn't the defense use the same tactic and get mrs. zimmerman on the stand to say that's my george screaming for his life? >> you better believe they will. in an ideal world what did we know. we know the state wanted to call an expert to say we examined and it was without question trayvon martin's voice. that didn't happen because of the hearing that the judge said it denied. why? the science is not reliable. we'll find human mind is not as reliable, the human condition is not as reliable. when you scream it's not something we're hearing all the time. we hear people. we speak to our family all the time but are we screaming in high pitched voices, are we under duress or stress. it comes down to reliability even tho trayvon martin's parents will say it was him and george zimmerman's parents will say it's him. will either be reliable. it cancels each other out. that's why the other evidence is important because of who was on top of who. if you conclude george zimmerman was screaming and fighting for his life then you can conclude the person on the bottom and if fear for their life is the one who was screaming. that's what it may come down to. we just had evidence that was given on 26th of february, that was the night of the killing within hours of the killing, george zimmerman is telling this police officer, help me, help me. he's killing me. i was screaming. it's very powerful given the fact that nobody knew about this case on that day. this was not a media explosion. this was just george telling the cop without any other material to come in and make this bigger than it was that night. it's become so much bigger. >> which has no basis to fabricate which makes it pow powerful be. >> you have got to look at that and say that's strong testimony. coming up after the break not only will you hear what george zimmerman told that police officer but what he did the next day by volunteering to go with the cops back to the scene of the incident and do a walk and talk, navigate them through the exact moments, the exact places, the same spaces. what about inconsistencies? 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(announcer) love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. >>> in the second-degree murder trial of george zimmerman live here in sanford, florida. you're not missing a moment of testimony. that's why you see the great seal. it means mikes a dead, action stops. it also gives an opportunity to put into perspective what you have heard and why it matters. sometimes it seems weird why certain things will played out in court but it's also a chess game and a puzzle. it's strategy. make no mistake. this morning you may have thought you were hearing a defense case but you're not. you're still in the prosecution case. last week you might have thought the same thing. you're still in the prosecution case. they could be headed somewhere very significant. there is more evidence, video taped evidence that's coming in likely today, probably this amp in this case and it's george zimmerman walking back to the scene of the incident, the killing the night before. the next morning bandaged up. he walks police investigators back through the scene and he gives them his perspective how it played out moment by moment. words matter. let's listen to this particular moment where he describes that fight and how it came to an end and words that were used. you see it. you can pick out any inconsistencies. have a listen. >> i kept yelling help, help. he put his hand on my nose and hi other hand on my mouth and he said shut the [ bleep ] up. i tried squirming again. when he was hitting my head against it felt like my head was going to explode and i thought i was going to lose consciousness. he only had a small portion of my head on the concrete. i tried to squirm off. when i did that somebody hear opened the door and i said help me, help me. that said i'll call 911. i said help me. i need help. i don't know what they did. that's when my jacket moved up and i had my firearm on my right side hip. my jacket moved up and he saw -- i feel like he saw and looked at it and he said you're going to die tonight [ bleep ]. he reached for it. i felt his arm going down to my side. i grabbed it an grabbed my firearm and i shot him one time. >> well, there you have it. listen to my untrained eye that sounds pretty darn consistent to what he said the night before to the investigator in the interrogation room and what rewrote down in his written statement that was played in open court just within the last hour. i'm not the best at this. mark nejame is here. he's tried a few cases in the state of florida and you've been privy to so much. you've been reading along with the discovery. i haven't been able to spot the inconsistencies that the prosecutor promised us would indict george zimmerman. you're better at this. >> you're right. i do not see any material dis e discrepancies. i don't see a single major inconsistency that the prosecutor can say he's lying. maybe they're going to measure out times and distances. with statements, he's been consistent from start to finish about how this played out. >> you do play by play with me. we're always chatting away as we're watching this happen live. the first thing is how can you have your hand over mouth and nose and continue a beat down, a ground and pound. >> that's a very valid point. all this is happening within split seconds. you heard him say his mouth was covered and nose which was consistent with his earlier statements but you didn't hear any of the other witnesses say yes that is what happened. we did hear them say it was a ground and pound. it was will be clear that it was george zimmerman on the bottom. the state is trying to make a case otherwise but i think it's weak, weak situation. grass stains, forensics. >> i can't wait for forensics. thank you very much. to the rest of my guests thank you very much. that's it for me. this has been a special edition of news room. you're going to go right back in for live testimony. i'm back here at 11:00 a.m. eastern. i'm ashleigh banfield. thanks for watching. for bringing us together. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for him, he's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with him all day as he goes back to taking tylenol. i was okay, but after lunch my knee started to hurt again. and now i've got to take more pills. ♪ yup. another pill stop. can i get my aleve back yet? ♪ for my pain, i want my aleve. ♪ [ male announcer ] look for the easy-open red arthritis cap. you will lose 3 sets of keys 4 cell phones 7 socks and 6 weeks of sleep but one thing you don't want to lose is any more teeth. if you wear a partial, you are almost twice as likely to lose your supporting teeth. new poligrip and polident for partials 'seal and protect' helps minimize stress, which may damage supporting teeth, by stabilizing your partial. and 'clean and protect' kills odor-causing bacteria. care for your partial. help protect your natural teeth. care for your partial. we know it's your videoconference of the day. hi! hi, buddy! that's why the free wifi and hot breakfast are something to smile about. book a great getaway now and feel the hamptonality >>> tragedy in arizona and george zimmerman on trial in florida. we're following developments this hour. a news conference set to begin on the tragic deaths of 19 elite firefighters in arizona. we'll take you there live. >>> a police officer takes the stand and the jury hears her recording with zimmerman the night he shot trayvon martin. this is cnn newsroom. we begin with the
MSNBC
Jul 5, 2013 2:00pm PDT
, the strongest prosecution witness was sybrina fulton, trayvon martin's mother who testified this morning very confidently that that was trayvon martin's voice on the tape. she was unshakeable in cross-examination and by the end of the day we have the battle of the two mothers, both testifying in a very sober and confident manner that it's their son. they have to cancel each other out. the defense is mindful of the theatrics that they leave the jury with. last weekend it was the photos of trayvon martin and now it's the family members i think leaving the your with the impression of at least that george zimmerman has a strong family that's standing behind him. >> i want to ask john burris again, the fact that trayvon martin's mother was very effective, i mean, i think that's the legal analysis of many people today, would that have prompted the defense to start with the voice and do you think he may have made a late game strategy change or did you think that he was going to leave this with us the whole time? >> no, he knew she was going to be the last witness, he had reason to belie
CNN
Jun 27, 2013 9:00am PDT
because of what trayvon martin was saying, you were paying more attention at this moment than you had been previously? >> yes, sir. >> and that you knew at this point that he had run and that he had lost the man, correct. >> yes, sir. yes, sir. >> and that his voice had changed. >> yes, sir. >> and you thought it was because he was tired from running? >> he sounded tired. >> you don't know how far he may have run. >> objection. >> overruled. it will not last time for that question. >> you don't know how far he had run. >> no, sir. >> and you have this conversation with him for a couple of minutes and then he says he sees the man again? >> yes, sir. >> and are you really paying attention now? >> i was really paying attention, sir. >> i am sorry? >> i had been paying attention, sir. been paying attention, sir. >> after you are talking to him on the phone, he seems out of breath for a couple of minutes. he says to you he sees the man again, and you pay particular attention now. >> i had been paying attention, sir, when i had called him back. >> so the answer is yes you were focusing
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